Category Archives: marketing insights

Marketing Trends for 2017

Here are five more marketing trends to watch for in 2017 (drawn from our MARKETING INSIGHTS slide deck):

Digital Afterlife

1 DIGITAL AFTERLIFE

Perhaps the biggest technological delight of 2016’s “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” was the digital resurrection of Moff Tarkin, the villain played by the late Peter Cushing (2013-1994). It was the clearest example yet of today’s CGI capabilities, when long-deceased humans can be brought back to life on the big screen.

MARKETING IMPLICATIONS

We hesitate to mention the most obvious (and terrifying): that brands will be able to use famous-but-dead spokespeople to hustle on behalf of their brand. That didn’t work out so well for Fred Astaire, whose image was controversially licensed by his widow (ten years after his death) for Dirt Devil vacuum cleaner TV spots, featuring the star dancing with a cordless Broom Vac.

More usefully, however, as the technology improves and matures, there’s potential for commercial-makers and production houses to “fix” in post-production problems such as performances that were not quite right on the day.

ephemera

2 EPHEMERA

What gives Snapchat its appeal? The fact that the content disappears. Snapchat’s rampant rise in popularity did a lot more for the world of social media than just give users another platform to choose from. It showed the value of disappearing or short-lived content. This is a key attraction for Generation Z, the cohort famous for having an eight-second attention span, and that is why you should be integrating short-lived content into your content strategy. (Forbes)

MARKETING IMPLICATIONS

Short has never been so important.  According to Facebook, people spend an average of just 1.7 seconds with a piece of content on mobile. Every second matters.

In fact, it takes only 0.25 seconds of exposure for people to recall content they saw on their mobile feed. These initial seconds can make a profound impact.

If people watch the first three seconds of a Facebook video, 65% watch the next seven seconds, and 45% make it to the 30-second mark. It’s a rude awakening for those of us used to producing 30 second spots to get our message out.

omnichannel

3 OMNICHANNEL

According to DMNews, 53 percent of consumers feel that it’s important for retailers to recognize them as the same person across all channels and devices used to shop, and 78 percent are also willing to allow retailers to use information from their in-store purchases to provide a more personalized experience. (AdWeek Social Times).

MARKETING IMPLICATIONS

Here are seven implications suggested by Mark Schaefer:

1. The best data miners win
Customers are going to leave a data trail on every level. The companies that can mine this stream will create powerful competitive advantage. That’s why, increasingly, marketing = math. Analytics is the key to the kingdom. For many retailers, data analysis may present the ONLY competitive advantage in a world of instant price comparisons and buy now buttons.

2. New resources, new skills
Not every customer will engage with you on every layer. That means your channel strategies are going to multiply, which means you need RESOURCES. Eighty percent of CMO’s say they are failing at OmniChannel marketing due to a lack of appropriate resources.

These new resources will also require a new outlook and new skills. Devin Wenig of eBay put it this way:

“Building engaging experiences across channels is incredibly important. Many retailers have spent their entire lives thinking about how to build an engaging experience in one channel, usually a store. But now, understanding how to connect with your core customers across every way they want to connect — not the way you want them to connect but the way they want to connect with you — is a different skill.”

“It requires design and product management. It requires understanding how to market in a digital world. There are still many instances that I see where it is old-school marketing. It’s still about major TV campaigns, get people into the stores. That’s still important, and that’s not going to go away.

“But understanding how to engage in a world of exploding social networks, how to use search, how to optimize, and how to engage—very different skills. I think that is going to become a core part of the playbook for retailers and merchants of all sizes around the world.”

3. Distinctive ubiquity
Standing out in an increasingly complex and cluttered world across all of these channels is not going to be easy — or cheap. If the experiences in each channel are not uniquely helpful, you risk annoying customers with repetitive ubiquity everywhere they turn.

While “multi-channel” may be losing its luster as the buzzword of choice, in fact you need to connect with consistent, but different, approaches by channel.

Your goal needs to be “Distinctive Ubiquity.”

4. Measurement wins
Like social media in general, measurement can be difficult. Ironically, the companies most likely to succeed and fund new initiatives are the ones best able to measure success. According to a recent study, 85% of CMOs are doing NO measurement of cross-channel efforts.

In this rudderless environment, how do you know how to invest in the marketing that works? Measurement can certainly be a source of competitive advantage.

5. Breaking down the silos
Retailers indicate their biggest challenge remains merging the digital and physical retail worlds into an easily understood and executed system. These consumer interactions are so complex and rapidly evolving that it is difficult to pin down a direction.

One large retailer I spoke to operates store merchandise marketing, media marketing and Internet marketing as completely different silos … and they all have different goals. This company is potentially years away from a consistent, integrated approach unless they can break down organizational silos, both internally and with their advertising partners.

6. Un-learning what we did best
I believe the single biggest hurdle to OmniChannel success wil be the cultural battle that will wage between a centuries-old mindset of “stack it high, move it fast” and exceeding quarterly numbers to re-orienting on the desire of customers to dictate the terms of a buying process based on the latest apps and social media buzz.

There are implications for the organizational structure, external partnerships, fulfillment, merchandising — almost every aspect of the process.

7. An overhaul of the fulfillment system
If retailers can break from this mindset (and I think they will), it presents a new dilemma — accurate fulfillment. Today, fulfillment is choreographed carefully between manufacturing, procurement, marketing, and distribution. Everything must work in harmony.

Planning for seasonal fashion changes or even an annual update to a furniture line can take more than a year of supply chain planning. Following the customer through an ever-changing digital buying cycle requires complex and potentially expensive new fulfillment models.

digital-twins

4 DIGITAL TWINS

A digital twin is a virtual representation of a process, product or service. Using software on a cloud-based platform, digital twins pull together and analyze data that companies can use to monitor and head off repairs and other problems before they occur. They can look into the future, simulating scenarios to uncover new opportunities for delighting customers. The data is deep and broad, encompassing business content like the customer’s name, exact street location and service level agreements. Information is also contextual and of course, from sensors. (Gartner)

MARKETING IMPLICATIONS

As the Harvard Business Review observed (here and here), smart, connected products raise a new set of strategic choices related to:

  • how value is created and captured
  • how the prodigious amount of new (and sensitive) data they generate is utilized and managed
  • how relationships with traditional business partners such as channels are redefined; and
  • what role companies should play as industry boundaries are expanded.

Smart, connected products are emerging across all manufacturing sectors. In heavy machinery, Schindler’s PORT Technology reduces elevator wait times by as much as 50% by predicting elevator demand patterns, calculating the fastest time to destination, and assigning the appropriate elevator to move passengers quickly. In the energy sector, ABB’s smart grid technology enables utilities to analyze huge amounts of real-time data across a wide range of generating, transforming, and distribution equipment (manufactured by ABB as well as others), such as changes in the temperature of transformers and secondary substations. This alerts utility control centers to possible overload conditions, allowing adjustments that can prevent blackouts before they occur. In consumer goods, Big Ass ceiling fans sense and engage automatically when a person enters a room, regulate speed on the basis of temperature and humidity, and recognize individual user preferences and adjust accordingly.

[Digital Twin] infrastructure enables extraordinary new product capabilities. First, products can monitor and report on their own condition and environment, helping to generate previously unavailable insights into their performance and use. Second, complex product operations can be controlled by the users, through numerous remote-access options. That gives users the unprecedented ability to customize the function, performance, and interface of products and to operate them in hazardous or hard-to-reach environments.

Third, the combination of monitoring data and remote-control capability creates new opportunities for optimization. Algorithms can substantially improve product performance, utilization, and uptime, and how products work with related products in broader systems, such as smart buildings and smart farms. Fourth, the combination of monitoring data, remote control, and optimization algorithms allows autonomy. Products can learn, adapt to the environment and to user preferences, service themselves, and operate on their own.

smart-tv

5 SMART TV

Convergence, threatened for years, is finally here. Television content is migrating everywhere and digital content is returning the favour, showing up on TVs (often at sizes and resolutions far greater than the content creators envisaged).

MARKETING IMPLICATIONS

Dan Calladine, head of media futures, Carat Global (quoted by the Daily Telegraph):

“Many people now have the ability to put video from the web on to the biggest screen in the home, thanks to devices such as Google’s Chromecast and Amazon’s Fire TV Stick.

“Big and small players can now easily get involved. Gaming company Toca Boca became a global kids’ TV channel overnight when it introduced video to its app. Twitter and Facebook have both made apps that allow users to put videos from their feeds on to the TV, including Twitter’s live NFL games.

“This new technology also brings a return path; Mr Porter has shoppable videos on Apple TV, and Facebook is experimenting in the US with putting ads, using its own targeting, on platforms such as Roku.”

Is YOUR digital content ready for the big-screen treatment?

 

Launch 2017 with a comprehensive presentation to your team or your clients

The Marketing Trends above are just a few of the many we cover in our NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017 presentation and slide deck, which is now available for you to present to your people or your customers.

Let’s have a little peek inside, at some of the marketing trends that will impact on Kiwi marketers in 2017.

Marketing Insights for 2017

The Big Picture

This first section of the presentation takes a look at what we can expect in 2017 from an economic and political perspective, post-John-Key, post-Brexit and post-Trump.

Who We Are

Then we review our demographic and behavioural profile, based on a recent consumer lifestyle study, update statistics about our ethnicity and age and take a closer look at what it means to be a Kiwi.

How We Browse

When and how we go online plays an important role in determining whether or not we are open to marketing messages. In this section we identify the best times to talk to prospects.

How We Shop

Our choice of supermarket says a lot about how often we go grocery shopping and how much we spend. We discuss Kiwi shopping behaviours and then take a closer look at foods we actively avoid eating. We also discuss the latest shopping developments, identify hot new retail arrivals and review the latest fashion colours and styles we can expect to see in store in 2017.

Marketing Trends

Next, we take a look at what’s new and different in television, including the latest statistics about where we spend our viewing time, and then take a sneak peak at some of the more notable upcoming television programs of 2017.

We then turn our attention to newspapers and take a closer look at the Fairfax/NZME merger — and in particular at the issues raised by the Commerce Commission.

The latest Out of Home developments come next, closely followed by what’s new in magazines.

Marketing Insights for 2017

Then we consider Cinema, evaluating movie attendance patterns that may change our thinking about how best to use the medium. We look at the top movies of the year and provide an extensive rundown of expected blockbusters in 2017.

Next on the list: radio and its ongoing move to Digital.

Then we turn our attention to Experiences, review their importance (especially for millennials) and run through upcoming major events for the year.

Then it’s time to turn our focus to digital.

We review some of the staggering statistics as a majority of New Zealand opts for unlimited data and consider the implications for NZ marketers now that Mobile dominates Internet usage.

We delve into the latest developments in Social Media, covering Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and Google Plus.

Marketing Insights for 2017

We update the latest online video numbers and then dig deep into Messaging Apps.

A roundup of key marketing technology trends follows, including Personalisation, the Internet of Things, Augmented Reality, AI, Programmatic, Virtual Reality, Drones, Context Brokering, Blockchain and Wearables.

Marketing Insights for 2017

And we close with a brief look at Future Technology trends that will impact in later years.

Purchase your copy today

As we mentioned, our 340-plus-slides MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017 presentation is NOW AVAILABLE. It’s unbranded, for you to present as you see fit to your clients.

This presentation looks ahead at what marketers should expect and plan for in 2017, across a wide variety of industries and technologies — based on local and global trends you may not yet have had the opportunity to examine — turning those forecasts into a comprehensive NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017 report & slide deck in PowerPoint format (with accompanying notes) – information that you can easily present to your team and your clients, bringing everyone up to speed on the latest New Zealand marketing insights as we accelerate towards 2017.

The NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017” report and slide deck is NOW AVAILABLE, HOT OFF THE VIRTUAL PRESS. GRAB YOUR COPY TODAY, just $497+GST.

Click here to pay by credit card through PayPal:
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=B6N4C5BPZ7ACQ

If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

PS If you prefer, we can present our MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017 to your team or your clients for just $777+GST (plus travel expenses if you are out of Auckland). Only limited places are available, so BOOK NOW by emailing [email protected] or by clicking here: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=SM8XEJ6UP3RHA

 

The Trump Shock & The Dangers of Only Listening to Others Like You

The Trump Shock

The Trump Shock & The Dangers of Only Listening to Others Like You

2016 really has been a year for Black Swan events — results that were as transformative as they were unexpected.

First it was Brexit, then President Trump.

The media, researchers, commentators and academics all expected a different result. Yes, their data suggested, it would be close — but smart money was on the traditional outcomes.

The people voted otherwise — to the shock and horror of the usual suspects.

So what happened — and, from our perspective, what are the implications for marketers?

TALKING AMONGST THEMSELVES

It’s become more and more apparent in recent times that online social chatter — especially via forums such as Twitter — has been dominated by highly vocal contributors who often behave like (not to be too delicate about it) bullies, criticising and marginalising those whose opinions are not the same as theirs.

Unsurprisingly, those with contrary views have therefore been removing themselves from what was supposed to be a debate but instead has become a monologue.

As a consequence, many crowd platforms have become single-voice platforms … and nowhere is that more evident than in the political arena, where silence has become the preferred option for those whose views run contrary to prevailing viewpoints.

That does not mean, of course, that the silent crowd has changed its opinion — simply that it saves its efforts for the ballot box, where such opinions can, and in fact have, changed nations.

In the UK, it’s been dubbed the “Shy Tory” factor:

Shy Tory Factor is a name given by British opinion polling companies to a phenomenon first observed by psephologists in the 1990s, where the share of the vote won by the Conservative Party (known as the ‘Tories’) in elections was substantially higher than the proportion of people in opinion polls who said they would vote for the party. This was most notable in the general elections of 1992 and then 2015, when the Conservative Party exceeded opinion polls and comfortably won re-election. (Wikipedia)

THE LESSONS FOR MARKETERS

Colin Shaw, writing on LinkedIn in 2015 in the aftermath of the unforeseen UK election landslide, suggested three lessons for marketers. We’ve added two more, which we’ll get to in due course:

Why did people say they were going to vote one way and then change their mind? My take is people often say one thing and do another.

Since many marketers are also responsible for polling for their brand, maybe we can glean some wisdom from the polling failure by taking a closer look at Why People Say One Thing and Do Another.

Reason #1: It is a complex process to understand what people (and Customers) want.

The pollsters weren’t trying to get it wrong. They were earnest in their efforts to get a sample on which they could predict where the election was headed. So they, like all of us, were scratching their heads when the dust settled, and the Conservatives won a clear majority. Even if they were reaching a broad sample of the British population, the answers they got back might not have been accurate. Why? Because sometimes the voter didn’t know what they wanted yet. What they wanted for the election was “hidden” in their subconscious, down in the emotions.

What Can Marketers Learn From This?

Many times there is a hidden part of how a Customer feels that drives their behavior. You might complete research where Customers tell you they want something, implement that something, and see no change in Customer behavior. It’s important to look for the causes of the behavior to see what Customers really want. We find most often in our work that these causes are hidden down in the emotional subconscious.

Reason #2: People have two ways of thinking about things and whichever one is in control at the moment will direct their behavior.

We know there is a big difference between what people say and what people do.Sometimes people don’t know what they want until they are forced to make a decision, as in the voting booth. However, the way people make decisions many times, is with their heart not their head.  In Professor Daniel Kahneman’s book, “Thinking Fast and Slow,” we learn about the System One (emotional, instinctive, fast) and System Two (methodical, logic-based, slow) thinking. On the poll inquiry, they could have used System One thinking, answering quickly without using their more rational thinking from System Two. However, System Two might have showed up for the actual vote. Or vice versa. It is, in many ways, mysterious.

What Can Marketers Learn From This?

Essentially, the difference between what people say they will do and what they actually do is the core message of our Emotional Signature. People are not rational, so basing your actions on research addressing the rational side of your experience is not going to get you to where you need to go. Every brand has an experience that generates emotions that drive your Customer’s behavior—and they are not rationally based. Exploring the emotions connected to your brand is going to give you a much better basis for predicting how Customers react.

Reason #3: Marketers need to consider how the data is being collected.  

In an article on the Huffington Post on the polling debacle, a correspondent argued old methodologies for polling might have contributed to the error. Polling results come from sampling the population, usually via their home phone. As many of you can imagine, it is increasingly difficult to reach people on a home number. Why do pollsters still use the home phone in 2015 you might ask? Because there is a consensus amongst pollsters that mobile phones “are unreliable.” But frankly, if you aren’t reaching me on my mobile you can rely on not reaching me. I have a feeling that’s true for more than one of you reading this.

What Can Marketers Learn From This?

It’s important to change your methods of communication if you want to get a “sample” of the population. Don’t let the way things have always been done be the driver for your methods.

Politics and polling go together. They are essential to those who run and those who vote. However, in the election in the UK [last year], the pollsters failed to provide an accurate representation of voters’ intentions, leaving many wondering if the methodology needs a closer look. My take is it probably should, but also that human irrationality and emotions played a part in the inaccuracy as well.

And a fourth reason, which Mr Shaw didn’t mention at the time:

Reason #4: those with opinions that are not considered “politically correct” simply won’t share them publicly

As we’re starting to see from post-mortems on Brexit and on the Trump presidency, when consumers hold contrary views, they’ve learned to keep those to themselves. Even so, when the time comes, those opinions will still drive their actions.

What Can Marketers Learn From This?

Whether you’re launching a new product or promoting an existing one, you should take care to canvas the opinions of a representative cross-section of your target audience. Too many products have failed because they were based on the needs and desires of the creators of the marketing (and their peers) rather than the wishes of the true consumers.

Then there’s a fifth and perhaps most important consideration of all, contributed to Forbes by John Carpenter the day after the Trump result:

Reason #5: Strong Emotions Can Really Make A Big Difference

While polling data correctly predicted [that Hillary Clinton would win the popular vote], it failed to make the more nuanced call that anger among working class white voters ran deep, and would drive them to the polls in larger numbers than the luke-warm Clinton supporters in the Democratic base.

Many pollsters are whining that they got the big picture right. What they got wrong was the much-harder-to-measure sense of how likely people were to vote. They knew that Clinton, like Trump, was disliked by many voters. What they failed to predict was that Clinton’s “negatives” would weaken turnout among people who had voted for Barrack Obama – votes she needed and didn’t get, especially in key states.

Trump is no luddite. He understands the power of the social media echo chamber, maximizing the strength of his 14.2 million Twitter followers to spread his unfiltered message. His opponents, meanwhile, angrily denounced him in post after post, most of which were read almost exclusively by like-minded opponents.

Arguably, similar passions for change drove pro-Brexit voters in the UK.

What Can Marketers Learn From This?

Are your supporters passionate — or merely accepting? Would they go out of their way to choose your product over a competing brand? Are they true fans, or might they easily be wooed away by a better price or a more enticing argument?

If you don’t know the answer to that question — or, worse, if the answer is negative — then your brand is vulnerable.

So what else should NZ marketers watch for in 2017?

Well, when it comes to Black Swan events like those above, our crystal ball is probably no better than yours.

But what we have done is look ahead at what marketers should expect and plan for in 2017, across a wide variety of industries and technologies — based on local and global trends you may not yet have had the opportunity to examine — and we’re turning those forecasts into a comprehensive NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017 report & slide deck in PowerPoint format (with accompanying notes) – information that you can easily present to your team and your clients, bringing everyone up to speed on the latest New Zealand marketing insights as we accelerate towards 2017.

Marketing Insights 2017

This comprehensive slide deck, with accompanying notes, consists of at least 200 slides covering:

  • The latest NZ research and statistics, and what they mean for New Zealand marketers
  • Local and international television trends and comments
  • The changes impacting NZ newspapers and their implications for marketers
  • Is Small Data the new Big?
  • Magazine news and trends
  • What you need to know about Radio for 2017
  • The very latest on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Google Plus and other key social properties
  • The new popularity of Slack, Yammer and Facebook At Work and what they mean for businesses
  • Programmatic advertising explained and explored
  • Online video – how can you take advantage of this seemingly unstoppable trend?
  • Wearables: fad or threat?
  • Messaging Apps reviewed and implemented
  • Context brokering and smarter business decisions
  • Loyalty program evolution and opportunity
  • Smart Data Discovery and analytics enhancements
  • Google Assistant, Siri, Cortana and the new breed of AI mobile support
  • Is your content really mobile-savvy?
  • How can you use AI?
  • Drones and their promotional potential
  • The latest on the Internet of Things
  • Blockchain and its marketing uses
  • Emerging technologies such as Smart Dust and 4D printing – and why you should be getting ready for them now

There’s plenty more, covering old and new media, insights and analytics, strategies and tactics – but we think you get the idea.

The NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017” report and slide deck is NOW AVAILABLE, HOT OFF THE VIRTUAL PRESS. GRAB YOUR COPY TODAY!

RRP for NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017” is $497+GST.

 

Click here to pay by credit card through PayPal:
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=B6N4C5BPZ7ACQ

If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

Are You Ready for What’s Coming in 2017?

2016 has been a tumultuous year internationally, what with Brexit and Trump vs Clinton and all.

Locally, we’ve had a relatively quiet year politically, but in the marketing arena we’ve seen plenty of disruptive activities such as our two newspaper giants planning to merge, Sky and Vodafone getting together … and those are just a couple of the big, high-profile happenings. Plenty of other changes are taking place all around us.

So what’s going to happen to NZ marketing in 2017?

Well, when it comes to Black Swan events — paradigm shifts that seem to come out of nowhere — our crystal ball is probably no better than yours.

But what we have done is look ahead at what marketers should expect and plan for in 2017, across a wide variety of industries and technologies — based on local and global trends you may not yet have had the opportunity to examine — and we’re turning those forecasts into a comprehensive NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017 report & slide deck in PowerPoint format (with accompanying notes) – information that you can easily present to your team and your clients, bringing everyone up to speed on the latest New Zealand marketing insights as we accelerate towards 2017.

Marketing Insights 2017

This comprehensive slide deck, with accompanying notes, consists of at least 200 slides covering:

  • The latest NZ research and statistics, and what they mean for New Zealand marketers
  • Local and international television trends and comments
  • The changes impacting NZ newspapers and their implications for marketers
  • Is Small Data the new Big?
  • Magazine news and trends
  • What you need to know about Radio for 2017
  • The very latest on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Google Plus and other key social properties
  • The new popularity of Slack, Yammer and Facebook At Work and what they mean for businesses
  • Programmatic advertising explained and explored
  • Online video – how can you take advantage of this seemingly unstoppable trend?
  • Wearables: fad or threat?
  • Messaging Apps reviewed and implemented
  • Context brokering and smarter business decisions
  • Loyalty program evolution and opportunity
  • Smart Data Discovery and analytics enhancements
  • Google Assistant, Siri, Cortana and the new breed of AI mobile support
  • Is your content really mobile-savvy?
  • How can you use AI?
  • Drones and their promotional potential
  • The latest on the Internet of Things
  • Blockchain and its marketing uses
  • Emerging technologies such as Smart Dust and 4D printing – and why you should be getting ready for them now

There’s plenty more, covering old and new media, insights and analytics, strategies and tactics – but we think you get the idea.

The NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017” report and slide deck is NOW AVAILABLE, HOT OFF THE VIRTUAL PRESS. GRAB YOUR COPY TODAY!

RRP for NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2017” is $497+GST.

 

Click here to pay by credit card through PayPal:
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=B6N4C5BPZ7ACQ

If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

Marketing Insights publication – Download Free

marketing-insights-nz

Marketing Insights is a new publication collecting advice and opinion from leading NZ marketing professionals, supplemented by information drawn from elsewhere and interpreted from a Kiwi business perspective.

This is a content marketing project, featuring sponsored contributions covering key topics that will have a continuing impact on NZ marketers, today and tomorrow.

Our content ranges from statistics to creativity, from strategic planning to effective briefing. You’ll note a strong focus on matters digital, an inevitability as online achieves new dominance.

We haven’t abandoned off-line marketing however—our topics also include Trade Shows, Sponsorships and of course timeless marketing principles and practices that are relevant whatever the environment.

Grab your free copy NOW – just click here.

Are You a NZ Marketing Thought Leader?

An Invitation to New Zealand’s Leading Marketers

Join us in this sponsored thought leadership project, featuring insights from many of NZ’s leading marketers and communications professionals. It’s an opportunity to reinforce your position as a thought-leader in your category.

Marketing Insights 2016

MARKETING INSIGHTS
from New Zealand’s Leading Marketers

As the title suggests, MARKETING INSIGHTS is a new book collecting advice and opinion from leading NZ marketing professionals, enabling them to demonstrate Thought Leadership in their category. This is a content marketing project featuring sponsored contributions from many of New Zealand’s leading marketers.

The first edition will be published in late January 2016 and will be distributed free of charge in electronic form to a wide range of New Zealand marketing decision-makers, from small, medium and large organisations. The book will also be available to purchase in printed form a short time later.

Topics which marketers are invited to contribute include:

Marketing Trends, Challenges & Opportunities in 2016

Marketing Insight topics

 

CONTENT PARTICIPATION

This is a sponsored Content Marketing project. Marketers are invited to sponsor an article on one of the above topics and provide 500-1000 words on the agreed topic. All topic selection is subject to availability at time of booking. Relevant images are welcomed (high-resolution please).

A fee of $1295+GST applies for each sponsored contribution, due January 31 2016. However this fee reduces to $995+GST for payment in full received by December 31 2015.

All sponsored articles will include:

  • Author Credit
  • A sponsorship box at the end of the article, featuring the name & logo of your organisation, along with phone, email and website details.

The article can be written on your behalf, based on the topic you choose and featuring any key copy points that you wish to specify. Writing fees are $400+GST for 500 words, $750+GST for 1000 words.

Limited advertising may also be available in the publication.

Topics shown above are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Other topics may be proposed by sponsors and will be considered by the publishers.

Our booking deadline is December 21 (although you are advised to BOOK EARLY to secure your choice of topic) and our deadlines are December 31 (if you wish us to write the copy) or January 12 if you are providing complete copy.

DISTRIBUTION

This book will be distributed initially as an ebook, offered free of charge via email, to New Zealand marketing decision-makers on our 1600-strong marketing database, to 3000+ current and former participants in our online marketing courses, and also via marketing blogs and social media and through participating industry associations and trade media. It will also be made available to members of at least a dozen NZ LinkedIn business and marketing groups with a combined membership of more than 50,000 Kiwi business people.

The ebook will also, of course, be available for contributing sponsors to distribute freely to clients and prospects.

The book will also be available in printed form on an on-demand basis. The book will also be available for purchase via Amazon.com.

To participate, email us at michael (AT) netmarketingservices.co.nz