Tag Archives: Advanced Social Media

7 Obvious Signs That Your Organisation Needs Social Media Training

Time and again, we’ve seen that Social Media amplifies – sometimes for good, too often for bad or worse. Say something stupid in social media and there’s a better than even chance that the whole world will find out about it, far sooner than you think.

There’s really only one solution (and even that’s not guaranteed): learn what you should and shouldn’t say on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, LinkedIn and all those other social networks. Get some training before it’s too late.

So how do you know if you need social media training?

If your organisation exhibits any of these classic errors.

7 Obvious Signs That Your Organisation Needs Social Media Training

Social Media Warning Signs

Get yourself social media training fast if your business makes any of these mistakes:

1. Asking open-ended questions (and then ignoring the responses)

2. Getting into an argument and insulting your customers and followers

It was the customer service disaster heard around the Internet. An Arizona restaurateur, fed up after years of negative online reviews and an embarrassing appearance on a reality television show, posted a social media rant laced with salty language and angry, uppercase letters that quickly went viral, to the delight of people who love a good Internet meltdown.

Amy & The Cakes #fail

 

3. Not replying to questions and comments on your social media platforms.

Too many brands simply ignore what’s being said to them, with entirely predictable results. This graph from SocialBakers shows which industries are the best (and worst) at responding:

social media responses by industry

 

4. All you talk about in social media is yourself

Only 10% of what you talk about in social media should be yourself and your own products or services. The rest of your discussions should be about things that matter to your followers. Don’t be like this Donut shop, constantly posting meaningless pictures of donuts and drinks to an audience that couldn’t care less (3416 followers but less than a dozen likes per image).

donut posts that nobody cares about

 

5. Nobody’s talking about you

As you may have heard, Facebook is dialing back its organic reach. What that means, in a nutshell, is that even if someone likes your Facebook brand page, it’s most unlikely that they will see your posts in their newsfeed. That means, to all intents and purposes, that you’re invisible to your followers — unless (a) you promote your posts to them; or (b) you write posts that are sufficiently interesting and engaging that they get shared by the few that do see them (and thus get out to a wider audience).

The Star Wars page on Facebook, for example, despite 11 million followers, was only averaging around 15,000 weekly talks — until May the Fourth (“be with you”), when interest surged and more than a quarter of a million people found Star Wars worth talking about again on Facebook.

May the Fourth Be With You

 

6. Everybody’s talking about you (but not in a good way)

Justine Sacco, head of public relations for UK media giant IAC, flew towards Africa in December 2013, blissfully unaware of the uproar caused by her final tweet before boarding her 12-hour flight.

Justine Sacco

Even though Ms Sacco had a mere 200 followers, the tweet went viral even while she was flying. Her tweet was universally condemned as racist, resulting in the hashtag #HasJustineLandedYet trending worldwide. Unsurprisingly, Ms Sacco lost her job, her former employer apologised profusely and several AIDS charities received donations from appalled twitterati.

 

7. You post too often (or too seldom)

How often should you post to your social networks? That depends on (a) your networks; and (b) your followers.

If you’re posting to Twitter, for example, and reaching out to a business audience, then posting (variations on the same information) at three-hour intervals during the business day is acceptable — very few will see more than one post, given the transient nature of Twitter.

On the other hand, posting to a consumer audience via Facebook should be less frequent, because posts are likely to linger more there. Take a look at your Facebook page Insights data (via your Page Manager dashboard) and view “When Your Fans Are Online” (under “Posts”).

when your fans are online

Post perhaps twice a day, at times that coincide with most of your fans being online.

fans online

 

Once you realise you need Social Media Training

We would be remiss if we didn’t point you to our range of social media courses: overview here.

  • If you want a comprehensive overview of Social Media Marketing, its principles and its practices, start here
  • If you want a rundown of the latest developments, check out our Advanced Social Media Marketing course here
  • If you want to market your business on Facebook but don’t know how, our Complete Facebook Marketing course is the place to start
  • If you’re already active on Facebook but think you could be doing it better, our Facebook Accelerator course could be the one for you
  • If you operate in the B2B space, we strongly recommend you learn How To Use LinkedIn Effectively
  • If you plan to use social media but won’t be hands-on yourself, you should take a look at our course covering How To Prepare An Effective Social Media Brief

NZ’s Leading Pinterest Pages

We’re slowly assembling a database of Pinterest Pages created by or for NZ businesses and we’d welcome your input. Please tell us in the comments about any NZ business pages on Pinterest with more than 100 followers (yes, as few as that — Pinterest is still an acquired taste for most New Zealand marketers, and Kiwi companies have only a fraction of the followers on Pinterest when compared to the numbers they have attracted on Facebook or Twitter).

On the inevitably-flawed basis of the 497 NZ Pinterest Pages we’ve collected and analysed so far, here are the Top Ten Kiwi pages (ranked by Numbers of Followers), as at March 12 2013:

10. Black Cow Nz (mystichillsnz) — 551 Followers

pin10

 

9. DressMePretty .Co.NZ (DressMePrettyNZ) — 592 Followers

pin9

8. Good as Gold (goodasgold) — 690 Followers

pin8

7. Glassons (glassons) — 866 Followers

pin7

6. Farmers – Your Store (farmersnz) — 918 Followers

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5. Superette (superettestore) — 978 Followers

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4. Pure New Zealand (purenewzealand) — 1192 Followers

pin4

 

3. Styled NZ (StyledNZ) — 2,215 Followers

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2. Air New Zealand (airnewzealand) — 2,338 Followers

pin2

 

And, leading the charge (and, frankly, way, way out in front):

1. Michelle Halford (mgrim) — 15,808 Followers

pin1-580

NB: We’ve included Michelle in this list because her blog accepts advertising and sponsorship revenues, which from our perspective makes her operation a business. We left out a large number of other Kiwis who might otherwise belong on this list because, at least from what we could observe, they pin for pleasure rather than for business purposes.

 

Content Types

The types of Pinterest pages that are topping the polls here are no real surprise. As we noted in an earlier article, these are the most popular content types on Pinterest:

If your product falls within one of those categories, we recommend that you consider adding a Pinterest Page to your product portfolio, sooner rather than later — 291,000 Kiwi consumers visited the site in December 2012, according to Nielsen Online Ratings. That may be only about a tenth of the number of NZ visitors attracted to Facebook, but it’s still a sizeable chunk of potential buyers of your products or services.

PS We would be remiss if we didn’t mention that we cover Pinterest in detail in Lesson Two of our Advanced Social Media Marketing course.

 

Facebook launches Graph Search

In the finest “keep them guessing” tradition of the late Steve Jobs, Facebook had the tech journalist community buzzing over a mystery press conference scheduled for Wednesday morning. Speculation was rife: would the social giant launch a new mobile phone, perhaps, or had it acquired another key player in its ongoing battle for digital supremacy?

Now the wondering is over: Facebook’s big announcement is Graph Search, a Social Search Engine.

Finally! Facebook’s existing search engine is, frankly, not up to the rigours of searching through the trillions of entries of a billion members.

So what do we know about Graph Search so far, what makes it different to Google and what are the implications for marketers?

The first and most important point is that this is not web search, it’s social search. It’s designed to help Facebook members meaningfully sort through content that has been shared with them.

The second key point is that Graph Search is still in Beta release – Facebook is inviting users to sign up for early trials, but it’s only rolling out to a small number (in the hundreds or thousands) at first.

And the third key point is that Graph Search is the method by which Facebook intends to harness the social potential of its members’ accumulated postings (which has BIG implications for marketers).

Powered by Social Proof

For example: you want to go out for dinner tonight. What was the name of that Mexican restaurant your friend Janice loved? Now, instead of scrolling through screeds of Facebook posts — or giving up and phoning/texting Janice — you can use Graph Search to find Mexican restaurants in Wellington. Your results will include listings of restaurants that your friends who have checked in to or Liked.

You can quickly see the implications for marketers. Social Proof suddenly becomes not merely optional but essential — if your restaurant isn’t on Facebook, it won’t be caught in the Graph Search results so won’t even be part of the choice set.

The launch focused on four use cases for Graph Search: people, photos, places and interests.

Forbes, amongst many others, live-blogged these examples as they were announced by Mark Zuckerberg and the Facebook team:

Searching people: By typing in “friends of friends who are single men in San Francisco and who are from India” in the search box, the search engine highlights those search terms and brings up a list of eligible bachelors for matchmaking purposes.

Searching photos: You can type “photos of my friends taken in Paris” or “photos of my friends taken in national parks.” The searches bring up big tiled photos of the photos in that category. Or you can just search for “photos I like.” This brings in social gestures such as the “Like” that Facebook already has that tag photos and other objects. This is also data that Facebook has that competitors don’t. You can only see the photos that people have shared with you.

Searching interests: You can type in “Movies my friends like” or “TV shows my friends like.” Clearly this section of search has revenue potential. You can also search for “Videos by TV shows liked by my friends” this will bring up just the videos that TV shows have posted. “TV shows liked by doctors” shows that doctors like to watch Grey’s Anatomy. You can also search and see what kind of music people who like Mitt Romney or Barack Obama like.

Searching places: When traveling you can search for “bars in Dublin liked by people who live in Dublin” to get local insider information. Or search for people who have been to Ireland.

On privacy: Facebook has privacy shortcuts in a button on the upper right hand corner. Click on “Who can see my stuff” then photos to see the photos I have uploaded or that are tagged of me. Or you can see just the photos I’ve hidden from your Timeline. You can also send a message to the person who uploaded the photo asking them to take the photos down. For those inappropriate photos.

There’s also a partnership with Microsoft’s Bing search engine included for information that can’t be found in Facebook’s Graph Search.

We’ll be covering Graph Search and all its marketing implications in our new Advanced Social Media Marketing course (details here).