Tag Archives: times

NZ Facebook Marketing 2015: June Update

There’s been a lot of talk — and, frankly, a fair amount of doom and gloom — about marketing on Facebook in 2015. The most significant development in that sphere came from Facebook itself, which announced late last year that from January 2015 self-promotional posts on Facebook pages would no longer be shown to Facebook followers.

As we’ve commented previously, that’s both good news and bad news. Bad news because marketers fondly hoped that the fascinating news that they were offering a discount or having a sale would be freely distributed to all their followers by Facebook; good news, however, because the new rules actually require that marketers create posts that are relevant and interesting if they are to be shared.

So, here we are at the middle of 2015. How are we doing?

NZ Facebook Marketing 2015

If we look at how New Zealand Facebook pages scored this time last year versus this year, the answer is: not so good.

Across the 25,603 New Zealand pages we track, just 0.75% of followers were (to use Facebook’s terminology) “talking about” the pages in June 2015, compared with 1.92% in June 2014.

In other words, on average expect less than one in 100 of your followers to be “talking about” your posts this year, half the engagement you might have expected last year.

As always, of course, there are outliers — Facebook pages that achieve far better results. Let’s take a look at some of those pages and see what we can learn.

Most engaged Kiwi Facebook page of all (in percentage terms), at least in mid-June 2015, was the Fox Glacier TOP 10 Holiday Park & Motels page.

This normally unassuming page, with just 647 likes, achieved a “talking about” score of 812.86% – 5254 people were talking about this page, more than eight times as many as actually followed the page.

The reason for this indecent popularity: a single good Samaritan post that was widely shared.

Fox Glacier TOP 10 Holiday Park & Motels

This success is, alas, likely to be a one-off. On the other hand our next example is more replicable. It’s from Kings Sound Centre, whose page enjoyed 367.69% popularity thanks to a series of videos as part of an online talent quest, their NZ Music Month Ibanez Guitar competition:

Kings Sound Centre

For a more sustained success formula, check out ZM Online, whose success (272.82%) derives from multiple posts each contributing to total engagement.

ZM Online Facebook Stats

One common thread that you see across all these pages: these marketers are NOT talking about themselves, surprise surprise!

Media channels such as ZM Online obviously find it really easy to talk about other things that are relevant to their audience, without lapsing into self-promotion. They’re simply doing online what they already do through their own channels.

On the other hand, if we look at some of the NZ Facebook pages that are under-performing the average, we typically find plenty of posts that Facebook has deemed self-promotional and not to be shared (without the advertiser paying for the privilege).

For example, when NZ Breakers writes about products it is selling, such posts only get 9 likes and 1 share (despite the team’s 79,209 Facebook followers):

NZ Breakers

On the other hand, posts about its returning superstars do so much better:

NZ Breakers-2

Similarly, despite 1391 followers, My Little Gift‘s really cute pictures also fell afoul of Facebook’s new rules and attracted just 10 likes.

My Little Gift

Perhaps the toughest task in NZ Facebook Marketing 2015 is faced by retailers (both online and traditional), who’ve been accustomed to posting their new products to Facebook and attracting attention as a result. Now, businesses such as Designer Gear Women are greeted by deafening silence (just a single like for the post below) despite having 6,854 followers.

Designer Gear Womens

It’s not that their followers don’t like what’s being posted, but rather that (under NZ Facebook Marketing 2015 new rules), they’re simply not being shown the posts.

By the way, we should note that the three examples we’ve chosen are simply that — examples, drawn from the 13,836 New Zealand Facebook pages that have less than 1% of their followers talking about them. In fact, these three are much more successful than most, having already attracted thousands of followers. All we’re saying is that times have changed and now new Facebook Marketing strategies are required in 2015 and beyond.

 

So how can you actually succeed with NZ Facebook Marketing 2015?

For you to achieve success with NZ Facebook Marketing 2015, you need to put on your thinking caps and do some serious brainstorming about your content.

In our Facebook online training courses (Facebook Accelerator and the Complete Facebook Marketing course), we tackle the issue head-on, and recommend that you:

  • use Graph Search to learn more about your followers and the sort of content that will interest them
  • identify the types of posts that your followers are most likely to share
  • create more of those types of posts
  • create posts in styles and formats that encourage more engagement
  • identify when your followers are most likely to be active on Facebook
  • publish your posts at those times
  • post more frequently than in the past
  • pay to promote the best of your posts to your followers
  • bump evergreen popular content
  • aim to drive Last Actor engagement as much as possible
  • crunch your numbers regularly to see exactly how well you’re doing (and whether or not you’re fulfilling your potential)
  • use Facebook advertising to drive Facebook users to your website

PS We would be remiss if we didn’t suggest that you check out our Complete Facebook Marketing and Facebook Accelerator online training courses, which discuss in great detail exactly what you need to succeed in NZ Facebook Marketing 2015.

Were Your Posts Just Banned By Facebook?

banned-by-facebook

Late last week, Facebook gave businesses the bad news:

Overtly promotional posts will no longer be shown to page followers, beginning in January 2015.

Exactly what types of posts are banned? Here’s what Facebook specified:

  1. Posts that solely push people to buy a product or install an app
  2. Posts that push people to enter promotions and sweepstakes with no real context
  3. Posts that reuse the exact same content from ads

Facebook gave some hypothetical examples of undesirable posts, but here are just a few of the millions of real Facebook page posts that would seem to fall foul of Facebook’s new rules.

Posts that only talk about products you should buy:

banned-post-1

Or contests you can enter:

contents

 

And even big brands have Facebook page posts unlikely to survive the January 2015 promotional massacre:

uniqlo

Those 762 people who like the above post? They’re going to be out of luck, when January rolls around. They won’t see the Uniqlo promotional posts in their newsfeeds, so they won’t know about the deals.

The Continuing Push Towards Zero Facebook Engagement

This move by Facebook is just the latest step in the social network’s efforts to:

  • reduce unwanted clutter on users’ Facebook newsfeeds
  • drive down the reach of brands’ Facebook page posts (towards zero)

From a user-centric point of view, Facebook’s motives are not merely practical but praise-worthy. As Facebook notes, “our goal with News Feed has always been to show people the things they want to see. When people see content that’s relevant to them, they’re more likely to be engaged with News Feed”.

From the point of view of businesses, however, Facebook’s moves are typically not viewed in such a benign fashion.

As re/code notes, it’s “likely going to anger brands in the process, many of whom spent years building up a following for this very purpose. Why would Coca-Cola pay Facebook to promote one of its posts when it already has 90 million users following its updates?”

Facebook’s own guidelines for business pages spell out the social giant’s thinking:

Publicize exclusive discounts and promotions with ads
If you’re looking to inspire more purchases from your posts, create Facebook Ads with special discounts or promotions.

  • Use link ads to drive people to your site, and include special codes they can use at checkout
  • Drive urgency with a time prompt like “free shipping, this weekend only” or “12 hour flash sale”
  • Promote only products or services you think your audience is most interested in
  • Advertise end-of-year contests and giveaways to drive customer loyalty and sales

In other words, if you want to use Facebook to actually sell stuff, you can now expect to have to PAY.

Overcoming Facebook Frustration & Reaching Your Followers

So what should you do? Simply abandon your carefully-constructed Facebook presence? Or pay every time to reach your followers?

In our Facebook online training courses (Facebook Accelerator and the Complete Facebook Marketing course), we tackle the issue head-on, and recommend that you:

  • use Graph Search to learn more about your followers and the sort of content that will interest them
  • identify the types of posts that your followers are most likely to share
  • create more of those types of posts
  • create posts in styles and formats that encourage more engagement
  • identify when your followers are most likely to be active on Facebook
  • publish your posts at those times
  • post more frequently than in the past
  • pay to promote the best of your posts to your followers
  • bump evergreen popular content
  • aim to drive Last Actor engagement as much as possible
  • crunch your numbers regularly to see exactly how well you’re doing (and whether or not you’re fulfilling your potential)
  • use Facebook advertising to drive Facebook users to your website

 

Free Report on Facebook Advertising

If you want to sell anything through Facebook, it’s time to face the grim reality:

you’re simply going to have to pay to promote your products, through Facebook Advertising.

A word of warning, however: if you don’t know what you’re doing, it’s easy to burn through a lot of money fast, with minimal results.

To help, we’ve put together a special FREE report on getting started with Facebook Advertising.

 

GSWFB-cover-cropped-3D

This free report will tell you the 5 essential tips you simply MUST KNOW before you start advertising on Facebook.

So go ahead — grab your FREE copy right now!

Just click here for your free report.

 

 

7 Obvious Signs That Your Organisation Needs Social Media Training

Time and again, we’ve seen that Social Media amplifies – sometimes for good, too often for bad or worse. Say something stupid in social media and there’s a better than even chance that the whole world will find out about it, far sooner than you think.

There’s really only one solution (and even that’s not guaranteed): learn what you should and shouldn’t say on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, LinkedIn and all those other social networks. Get some training before it’s too late.

So how do you know if you need social media training?

If your organisation exhibits any of these classic errors.

7 Obvious Signs That Your Organisation Needs Social Media Training

Social Media Warning Signs

Get yourself social media training fast if your business makes any of these mistakes:

1. Asking open-ended questions (and then ignoring the responses)

2. Getting into an argument and insulting your customers and followers

It was the customer service disaster heard around the Internet. An Arizona restaurateur, fed up after years of negative online reviews and an embarrassing appearance on a reality television show, posted a social media rant laced with salty language and angry, uppercase letters that quickly went viral, to the delight of people who love a good Internet meltdown.

Amy & The Cakes #fail

 

3. Not replying to questions and comments on your social media platforms.

Too many brands simply ignore what’s being said to them, with entirely predictable results. This graph from SocialBakers shows which industries are the best (and worst) at responding:

social media responses by industry

 

4. All you talk about in social media is yourself

Only 10% of what you talk about in social media should be yourself and your own products or services. The rest of your discussions should be about things that matter to your followers. Don’t be like this Donut shop, constantly posting meaningless pictures of donuts and drinks to an audience that couldn’t care less (3416 followers but less than a dozen likes per image).

donut posts that nobody cares about

 

5. Nobody’s talking about you

As you may have heard, Facebook is dialing back its organic reach. What that means, in a nutshell, is that even if someone likes your Facebook brand page, it’s most unlikely that they will see your posts in their newsfeed. That means, to all intents and purposes, that you’re invisible to your followers — unless (a) you promote your posts to them; or (b) you write posts that are sufficiently interesting and engaging that they get shared by the few that do see them (and thus get out to a wider audience).

The Star Wars page on Facebook, for example, despite 11 million followers, was only averaging around 15,000 weekly talks — until May the Fourth (“be with you”), when interest surged and more than a quarter of a million people found Star Wars worth talking about again on Facebook.

May the Fourth Be With You

 

6. Everybody’s talking about you (but not in a good way)

Justine Sacco, head of public relations for UK media giant IAC, flew towards Africa in December 2013, blissfully unaware of the uproar caused by her final tweet before boarding her 12-hour flight.

Justine Sacco

Even though Ms Sacco had a mere 200 followers, the tweet went viral even while she was flying. Her tweet was universally condemned as racist, resulting in the hashtag #HasJustineLandedYet trending worldwide. Unsurprisingly, Ms Sacco lost her job, her former employer apologised profusely and several AIDS charities received donations from appalled twitterati.

 

7. You post too often (or too seldom)

How often should you post to your social networks? That depends on (a) your networks; and (b) your followers.

If you’re posting to Twitter, for example, and reaching out to a business audience, then posting (variations on the same information) at three-hour intervals during the business day is acceptable — very few will see more than one post, given the transient nature of Twitter.

On the other hand, posting to a consumer audience via Facebook should be less frequent, because posts are likely to linger more there. Take a look at your Facebook page Insights data (via your Page Manager dashboard) and view “When Your Fans Are Online” (under “Posts”).

when your fans are online

Post perhaps twice a day, at times that coincide with most of your fans being online.

fans online

 

Once you realise you need Social Media Training

We would be remiss if we didn’t point you to our range of social media courses: overview here.

  • If you want a comprehensive overview of Social Media Marketing, its principles and its practices, start here
  • If you want a rundown of the latest developments, check out our Advanced Social Media Marketing course here
  • If you want to market your business on Facebook but don’t know how, our Complete Facebook Marketing course is the place to start
  • If you’re already active on Facebook but think you could be doing it better, our Facebook Accelerator course could be the one for you
  • If you operate in the B2B space, we strongly recommend you learn How To Use LinkedIn Effectively
  • If you plan to use social media but won’t be hands-on yourself, you should take a look at our course covering How To Prepare An Effective Social Media Brief

Is OTT Messaging The New Social?

We’ve all become increasingly familiar with the tragic tales of people going for a job, standing for a public position or simply claiming to be off sick, only to be outed by their Facebook posts which reveal their failings, sins and indiscretions to the world.

We live in increasingly glass houses, where our lives are (in the finest tradition of The Truman Show) broadcast live to the world. Even if we avoid posting selfies in flagrante delicto, we can still end up tagged in photos that unflatter us. In the process of sharing stuff with our friends, we’re more and more likely to end up sharing with Google and its few billion acquaintances as well.

We’ve tended to view this is as an inevitable social transition, as the archaic notion of privacy is abandoned in favour of an always-connected “what happens in Vegas … now stays online forever” transparency paradigm. Yes, today’s employers may tut-tut and refuse to hire those whose indiscretions are blatantly displayed online; but tomorrow’s employers, their own failings similarly emblazoned across social networks, are likely to be more tolerant (or so we hope).

What we’re now seeing, however, is a move away from open social networks to the closed user spaces of OTT* messaging applications, especially amongst teens and young adults who are tired of leaving a digital trail which can be seen by parents and employers and by which they can be judged.

* These messaging applications are called OTT (Over The Top), to indicate that they sit on top of the mobile infrastructure, using internet data connectivity rather than the cellular messaging facility, usually at a much lower pricepoint

The move to OTT messaging is problematic for marketers, however, for several reasons:

1. No Clear Leaders

As ReadWrite notes:

“The messaging landscape is fragmented. Teenagers are ditching social media to chat on services like WhatsApp, Snapchat, WeChat and KakaoTalk. Apps like Kik, Line and Tango are other popular SMS replacements, [along with] Google Hangouts, Facebook Messenger, GroupMe and Skype.”

2. Advertising May Not Be Welcome

It doesn’t help that service providers such as WhatsApp are saying they don’t want to include advertising:

The people at WhatsApp say explicitly that they “are not fans of advertising.” Because of this, “WhatsApp is currently ad-free and we hope to keep it that way forever.” Are you listening, every other company? Because this is what users want.

Mainstream OTT messaging providers such as Facebook Messenger and Google Hangouts will be more sympathetic to marketers’ needs — but first they need to capture a significant market share.

3. Messaging Platforms Are Aiming To Keep Those Eyeballs Engaged

As always in the mobile space, the Asian markets demonstrate the future of OTT messaging platforms. According to BGR:

Mobile apps linked to messaging services are taking over the two most important Asian app markets, Japan and Korea. Today, nine out of the ten biggest revenue generators on South Korea’s Google Play app chart are Kakao apps. It is effectively becoming impossible to launch a major hit in the Korean app market unless you use Kakao’s messaging app as your platform. This in turn means that everyone interested in mobile apps is using Kakao. The messaging app has turned into the dominant platform for game distribution. LINE’s role in Japan is not quite as strong, but games for this messaging app regularly hold about half of the positions in Japan’s top-10 iPhone and Android app revenue charts.

… Time spent on messaging apps is exploding even in markets where games linked to these platforms have not yet taken off. According to The Hindu, people in India now spend 27 minutes per day on chat apps, up from 7 minutes just two years earlier. Many of the most populous countries in the world — China, India, Japan, Korea — have now fallen in thrall of the messaging apps. Their share of the daily leisure time of consumers is rapidly expanding. This will inevitably give messaging app vendors a golden chance to turn into content delivery companies. And to stage a serious offensive against Facebook, Twitter and Google.

Second, revenue growth generated by games linked to messaging apps is unearthly. LINE is now generating 67% revenue growth — between quarters, not annually. China’s WeChat is already on a big, global marketing binge, which has helped it boost its presence dramatically from Italy to Nigeria over the past summer.

Finally, one of the hottest app industry topics in Tokyo [at the Japan Game Show in September 2013] was the expansion of content services that we are about to witness. Over the next year, a rapidly expanding selection of comics, videos and music will start flowing to users of WeChat, LINE and Kakao.

4. OTT Messaging Is Taking Over from SMS

OTT Messaging isn’t only competing with Social Media, of course — it’s also taking on good old SMS text messaging, and (according to an April 2013 study by Informa) it’s already won. Business Insider reports that 41 billion OTT messages are now exchanged every day, compared with 19.5 billion SMS messages.

A late-2012 white paper by McKinsey highlights the key drivers of OTT adoption:

  • Technology Readiness, in the form of 3G or 4G networks; and penetration of smartphones
  • Cost Incentives, with SMS too expensive relative to data charges
  • Social Propensity, particularly driven by smartphone adoption amongst teens and young adults
  • Market share of specific OTT messaging applications

Here’s how those triggers drove adoption in South Korea and the Netherlands, according to McKinsey :

ott-triggers

Do most of these triggers apply in New Zealand? Indeed they do.

5. Blink And You’ll Miss It

As if the proliferation of messaging platforms was not enough to worry about in itself, we’re now seeing the development of content that, like SnapChat, self-destructs. Forbes reports:

[Ephemeral apps, such as, in this example, Frankly, work like this:] send a message, and your recipient will initially see a box of blurred text. Once they tap it, a set timer counts down the seconds till the message has been deleted; sent to the digital afterlife. Chat windows, for the most part, thus stand empty at all times. Each time someone sends a text, they can also tap a black “x” afterwards to take it back, in case they change their mind. The idea is that the sender is always in control.

“Maybe, just as the rise of big data and government surveillance and privacy concerns and the over-curated self images on Facebook, people are saying, ‘I miss the days when I could have a private conversation,’” says Frankly founder Steve Chung. “‘Maybe I’m not saying anything bad, but you and I sit down in a coffee shop and we remember what we remember. When we leave, we don’t have reams of paper that recorded it all.’”

The question then isn’t if people want their messages deleted — plenty seem perfectly happy to keep reams of recorded texts — but whether they want more control over what is recorded.

Other ephemeral messaging services include such little-known names as Wickr, Blink, Gryphn, Ansa, SecretInk and Tiger Text. They’re fighting for market share in a still-developing arena, responding to consumer demand for a little more privacy.

Your messages probably still aren’t safe from the likes of the GCSB, Julian Assange or Edward Snowdon, but at least your boss shouldn’t be able to read them without your permission.

PS We cover OTT Messaging in detail in our new Mobile Marketing course

Most Talked About NZ Facebook Pages – August 2013

If you’ve taken any of our Social Media courses, you’ll know that we keep harping on about Engagement — creating content that your followers want to talk about and share with their friends.

We thought it was time once again to check out which Kiwi Facebook pages are the most engaging right now, as at 19 August 2o13. We’ve sliced and diced the numbers two ways, firstly measuring Engagement as a percentage of Page Likes and secondly in terms of total volume.

Leading the first list by a country mile: Made4Baby.

made4baby

This Kiwi brand, which provides natural skincare for babies & children, has only 2,457 Likes but was talked about by 14,300 last week, representing 584.2% Engagement — nearly six times as many people talking about the Facebook page as it has followers.

And the most talked-about post? This one, on August 6:

dirtydishes

This image attracted 286 likes and a staggering 7,393 shares — the sentiment too good not to spread. Clearly Made4Baby understands its audience!

What other New Zealand Facebook pages got people talking? Here’s our Top 10 list:

Most Engaged NZ Facebook Pages August 2013
Engagement as a percentage of Page Likes

Page Name Likes Talking Engagement %
1 Made4Baby 2,448 14,300 584.2%
2 Kaukapakapa Veterinary Services. 55 176 320.0%
3 Shed 10 36 68 188.9%
4 TripMe.co.nz 618 1,139 184.3%
5 Deborah Quin 259 403 155.6%
6 The Factory 570 763 133.9%
7 The Natural Parent Magazine 41,718 55,002 131.8%
8 nzblokes.co.nz 38,527 47,232 122.6%
9 O’Neill New Zealand 587 634 108.0%
10 Dairy Womens Network 1,107 1,123 101.4%

On the other hand, if we just look at the total numbers talking about Facebook pages, these are the Top Ten:

Most Engaged NZ Facebook Pages August 2013
Highest Numbers of People Talking About The Page

Page Name Likes Talking About Engagement %
1 All Blacks 2,016,724 101,459 5.0%
2 The Natural Parent Magazine 41,718 55,002 131.8%
3 nzblokes.co.nz 38,527 47,232 122.6%
4 Paw Justice 268,229 28,398 10.6%
5 Flight of the Conchords 1,626,814 24,782 1.5%
6 Made4Baby 2,448 14,300 584.2%
7 Air New Zealand 647,475 13,710 2.1%
8 Tip Top Ice Cream 129,218 13,560 10.5%
9 Vodafone Warriors 107,180 13,416 12.5%
10 Peter Jackson 1,029,657 13,327 1.3%

NB: We’ve discarded a few pages which were Australia/New Zealand pages (eg BlackBerry Australia/New Zealand) or which were parent/child pages (eg Nissan NZ, where reported Likes and Talking About statistics were cumulative totals of all official Nissan pages globally).

Source of this analysis: the 19 August 2013 edition of our own Netmarketing Courses database of more than 31,000 NZ Facebook pages, for which we gather updated data weekly.

Why “Seeking New Opportunity” Doesn’t Work On LinkedIn

You’ve probably come across the phrase “seeking new opportunity” on LinkedIn. It’s a common euphemism for “I’m looking for a job“.

It’s a comfortable description. The only problem is that doesn’t work — at least, not in terms of getting the opportunity-seeking you in front of the people doing any hiring.

Why not?

In a word: keywords.

LinkedIn, with more than 200 million resumes on its books in the form of member profiles, uses keywords to guide the listings it promotes to the top of the results in response to any search.

Recruiters and prospective employers quickly learn to search through LinkedIn using keywords related to the job they’re offering, in combination with Location and (sometimes) industry. “Seeking” “new” and “opportunity” are seldom among those keywords.

So your headline, which is one of the five key places which LinkedIn searches for relevant keywords, needs to include keywords that are:

  • relevant to the job you’re seeking
  • reflect the words typically used to describe the desired skills and attributes of the sought-after role
  • and ideally provide an Added Value benefit for a new employer

What do  we mean by “Added Value benefit”?

As Dan Sherman, author of “Maximum Success With LinkedIn” notes:

In your headline, say what you are looking for but say it in a way that adds value to any company that hires you.

Let’s face it: recruiters and hiring managers only care about what you can do for them, so broadcast it in your headline.

Write: “Actively seeking an opportunity to bring my extensive sales leadershp experience to increase profits.” Or: “Pursuing an engineering opportunity to write code for the next big Internet success story.”

There’s a whole lot more that you need to do to your LinkedIn profile to help you find jobs on LinkedIn, but this is one of the most important, so if you currently use the offending “Seeking New Opportunities” headline, start thinking about relevant keywords instead.

So what should you do next?

We have some possibilities for you:

Option 1: Get a LinkedIn Profile Makeover

LinkedIn is a massively powerful social media business network — but far too many people are failing on LinkedIn because their profiles aren’t good enough.

So why should you have an effective LinkedIn profile?

If you are looking for a job (or might consider an offer):
Are you being approached by potential employers or their representatives through LinkedIn? Are they checking you out and then deciding not to go any further?

If your LinkedIn profile doesn’t do a great job of promoting you, your skills, experience and expertise, then you are definitely missing out on the opportunities that you could otherwise have through the world’s largest business social network.

We can help, by harnessing our many years of digital and traditional marketing expertise to give your Profile a sizzling customized revamp.

In the process, we’ll:

  • turn your Profile headline into search-friendly keywords that will sell your potential
  • recommend a photograph that showcases you at your most professional
  • review and rewrite your resume to highlight your career and its achievements
  • shine a light on your most desirable skills and experience
  • provide you with the tools to attract meaningful recommendations and endorsements from past & present clients and colleagues

As you might imagine, we can only take on a few individual clients, to ensure that we can give them our full attention.

We are currently offering to make over LinkedIn profiles — but only for a limited number of individuals.

WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM THIS SERVICE

We aim to makeover your LinkedIn Profile to achieve these key results:

  • To help you be found by prospective employers or clients on Google and in the LinkedIn search engine
  • To highlight your past achievements that represent tangible benefits to prospective employers or clients
  • To give confidence to those prospects that you have the right experience and expertise

HOW MUCH IS A LINKEDIN PROFILE MAKEOVER WORTH TO YOU?

An effective LinkedIn Profile can generate lucrative business worth many thousands of dollars — or help you score a new job. What would that be worth to you?

A strong LinkedIn profile will make you stand out and can lead to jobs, contracts, projects, speaking engagements, and new customer and prospect relationships.

LinkedIn provides a terrific opportunity to build your personal brand online, reinforcing what people already think of you professionally and revealing it to an expanded network.

Given the amount of time and effort we put into this Profile Makeover service, we should charge at least $597+tax for each Profile Makeover — that would be a small price to pay for such a service, to help ensure that your personal brand is the best it can be.

As a special marketing experiment, however, we’ve decided to offer our LinkedIn Profile Makeover service for a limited number of individuals for just $397+tax. Profiles will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis, so don’t miss out.

To reserve your LinkedIn Profile Makeover, please pay by credit card through PayPal by clicking here:

Register Now for the next course

If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

Once we receive and process your order, we’ll be in touch to begin the makeover process.

 

Option 2: Check out our Special Report on How To Find A Job on LinkedIn.

Read on for the details.

how-to-find-jobs

So you’re looking for a job. Are you using LinkedIn effectively to help with your job hunt?

According to recent U.S. research, half of all job seekers are active on social networking sites on a daily basis, and more than a third of all employers utilize these sites in their hiring process.

Forbes Magazine reports:

Career transition and talent development consulting firm Lee Hecht Harrison asked hundreds of job seekers via an online poll, “How active are you on social networking sites?” Forty-eight percent said they’re very active on a daily basis, while 19% said they log on about two or three times per week. Another 22% said they use social networking sites one to three times per month, or less. Only 11% of job seekers said they never use social networking websites.

And it’s not just job seekers. Recruiters and employers are heavy users of LinkedIn as well.

CareerBuilder.com conducted a survey last year that asked 2,303 hiring managers and human resource professionals if, how, and why they incorporate social media into their hiring process.

First they found that 37% of employers use social networks to screen potential job candidates. That means about two in five companies browse your social media profiles to evaluate your character and personality–and some even base their hiring decision on what they find.

CareerBuilder also asked employers why they use social networks to research candidates, and 65% said they do it to see if the job seeker presents himself or herself professionally. About half (51%) want to know if the candidate is a good fit for the company culture, and another 45% want to learn more about his or her qualifications. Some cited “to see if the candidate is well-rounded” and “to look for reasons not to hire the candidate,” as their motives.

Far too many LinkedIn members simply don’t know how to use LinkedIn effectively to find a job —  or even to present themselves in the best possible light to prospective employers.

Our Special Report aims to address those needs.

About the Special Report

This is a ten-part special report, providing a step-by-step guide to making your LinkedIn profile sparkle, connecting with those who can help you with your career quest, identifying and researching prospective employers and even helping you prepare for your interview. Collectively, these lessons are designed with the ultimate aim of helping you to find your next job on LinkedIn.

 

REPORT CREATION
This “How to Find Jobs on LinkedIn” special report has been created by Michael Carney. Michael has been in the marketing game since 1971, online since 1987 and keeps tabs on a wide range of trends and developments, locally and around the world. He is the author of  “Trade Me Success Secrets” (now in its Second Edition) and a regular magazine columnist. Michael is also the creator of a number of online training courses, covering social media, eCommerce and other aspects of digital marketing.

WHO SHOULD PURCHASE THE “HOW TO FIND JOBS ON LINKEDIN” REPORT

Anyone who is looking for a new job and realises that LinkedIn can help with that objective.

 WHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN AS A RESULT OF THIS REPORT

By the end of this special report, you should have developed an outstanding personal presence on LinkedIn, be networking effectively with people who can help you with your career quest and be making valuable contributions which will get you noticed by potential employers. You should also know enough for a much more effective interview where you can ask informed, intelligent questions of those who are interviewing you (and thus demonstrate what an excellent employee you would make).

REPORT CONTENTS

lesson-one

Lesson One: Signing Up

This is a short introduction for those new to LinkedIn. We show you what you need to do to establish your identity on LinkedIn, and where you should — and more importantly shouldn’t follow LinkedIn’s instructions to set yourself up on this global professional network.

lesson-two

Lesson Two: Your LinkedIn Profile

You’re probably one of the millions who already have a profile on LinkedIn — but is it just a transplanted CV? We show you how to turn your basic profile into a living, selling document that:

  • showcases your unique talents and experience to best advantage
  • reinforces your personal brand with a compelling headline that’s the first thing any visitor will see
  • highlights your achievements, not just your history
  • provides a platform for your future success

Lesson Two also covers:

  • The most effective ways to ask for recommendations and endorsements
  • How to use the principle of Reciprocity to sharpen your profile
  • Trojan Horse Marketing and how it can really work for you
  • How to claim your name on LinkedIn (and why it matters)
  • How to optimize your profile for SEO
  • How to use LinkedIn’s Mobile Apps and how you can ensure that your profile stands out on every platform
  • The power of an effective profile summary
  • How to re-shape your profile to make it sizzle (and show off your best bits)

lesson-three

Lesson Three: Preparing To Find A Job

Lesson Three discusses the different approaches you should take on LinkedIn, depending upon whether or not you’re currently employed or if you now think it’s time to switch to a different career.

In this lesson, we discuss:

  • What you absolutely SHOULD NOT SAY on your LinkedIn Profile (and why not)
  • The most effective headline approaches for those out of work
  • What you should do if you have a gap in your resumé
  • How to minimise the chances that your boss will discover you’re looking for a new job
  • Seven key tips for career-changers

lesson-four

Lesson Four: Polish Up That Profile

In Lesson Four we talk about the importance of ensuring that your LinkedIn profile is filled out completely and you’re adding relevant skills.

Lesson Four covers:

  • The types of Profile content that are more likely to get you interviewed
  • The worst possible photos to feature on your page (we found some shockers in just a few minutes’ browsing)
  • Why both the type and volume of recommendations are important to your career hopes (and how to attract recommendations quickly)
  • Why it’s so important to carefully manage the Endorsements you receive from others (and exactly how you can do just that)
  • How your past can take you back to the future

lesson-five

Lesson Five: Being Found On LinkedIn

In Lesson Five we discuss the sobering statistic that 80% of jobs are never advertised — and the essential steps you need to take to get yourself on the radar of recruiters and prospective employers.

In this lesson, we review:

  • How recruiters search (and how you can dramatically improve your chances of being seen)
  • Why the number of LinkedIn connections you have DOES make a huge difference
  • The secret to growing your network fast
  • A very smart strategy for finding appropriate keywords for your dream job
  • Where you MUST put your chosen keywords if you want them to be most effective
  • The cautionary tale of a LinkedIn profile that (at casual glance) looked fine but probably won’t get the applicant seen, let alone hired

lesson-six

Lesson Six: Maximum Visibility

Companies and recruiters can see how active you are on LinkedIn — and use that as one of the signals to determine whether you would be a good fit for their organisation.

In Lesson Six, we discuss:

  • What activities you should do on LinkedIn that will reflect well on your employability rating
  • How to be seen regularly by your network (without annoying them)
  • Whether you should join LinkedIn Groups (and which groups to join)
  • How to craft effective Recommendations that help your personal brand as well
  • LinkedIn’s new Mentions feature and whether you can use it effectively for your own benefit
  • All about Premium Job Seeker Accounts, their various features and how to decide if they’re worth the investment

lesson-seven

Lesson Seven: LIONs

LIONs (Linked In Open Networkers) make it possible for you to connect quickly to hundreds or even thousands of others on LinkedIn. But are they are a good idea for you?

In Lesson Seven, we explore:

  • How to make LIONs work for you
  • The three words that can see you end up on LinkedIn’s blacklist
  • The pros and cons of open networking
  • How open networking works (or not) for Kiwis
  • What happens if you do become a LION
  • How to identify the most useful new followers
  • How to remove the unwanted

lesson-eight

Lesson Eight: Find Employers

So far, we’ve discussed how to make your Profile bright and shiny (and relevant) so that you can get found; and the steps you can take to make yourself as visible as possible. Now it’s time to look at the other side of the coin: how to search out prospective employers on LinkedIn.

Lesson Eight reveals:

  • Search strategies to find potential employers
  • How to find the newest hires (and also those who have left the company)
  • Meaningful questions to ask about the company before you go any further
  • Why you should follow ALL the companies on your shortlist of places to work

lesson-nine-rev

Lesson Nine: Looking For Jobs

Lesson Nine takes you through the steps necessary to track down the jobs that are listed on LinkedIn (typically only a small fraction of those listed on Trade Me Jobs or Seek).

In this lesson we review:

  • How to craft your search criteria to get relevant results
  • How to look for people you might know who can help you with a particular vacancy
  • The LinkedIn application process (it’s not complicated, which can sometimes work in your favour)
  • The four things you should never do if you’re looking for a job on LinkedIn

lesson-ten

Lesson Ten: Using LinkedIn To Prepare For The Interview

Finally, in Lesson Ten we explore how LinkedIn can help you to prepare for a job interview.

We take you through:

  • The inspiring tale of the unqualified candidate
  • The huge volume of information that you can gather through LinkedIn
  • How a study of the job poster can show much more than they ever intended to reveal
  • A quick way to find a large number of people who can give you more information about the prospective employer and the industry
  • What Groups, Causes and Interests can tell you about the company’s culture

TIMING

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