Category Archives: social media monitoring

November Specials

Our October Special Offers are over but we have some November-only specials you really should consider:

OFFER 1: Access to all our courses until the end of 2018, with the All Access Pass.

The pass offers you access to our current 14 courses (total value $6,849+GST), plus any new courses we offer in 2018, all for one low price – $1,495+GST per person.  Access more than two courses and you’re already saving money! (In fact, even if you sign up for our All-Access Pass and just take our Digital Marketing 101 course, you’ll be saving hundreds of dollars on the standard course cost).

all-access-individual-700

Just click here to sign up for our individual All Access pass for just $1,495+GST (this offer valid only until midnight November 30):

That’s the link to make credit card payments by PayPal. If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

CORPORATE SPECIAL OFFER

all-access-corporate-700

We are also offering a similar very special offer for Corporate Buyers. Sign up for an All Access pass for your organisation for just $4,997+GST and we’ll provide access to all of our courses for up to 5 of your team. That’s potentially more than $30,000 worth of training for a fraction of the cost.

Pay just $4,997+GST for an All Access Corporate Pass for up to 5 staff (this offer valid only until midnight November 30):

Full details here: https://socialmedia.org.nz/2017/10/surviving-digital-marketing-challenges/

 

OFFER 2: SOCIAL MEDIA MONITOR

Our Social Media Monitor is a snapshot of NZ social media activity for the previous month, across Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn, for the major players in a specific industry.

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Social Media Monitor reports can be created for any highly-competitive industry sector in any country. A few other sectors we’ve identified include:

  • Automotive Manufacturers
  • Major Retail Chains
  • Airlines
  • Fuel Companies
  • Power Companies
  • Telecommunications
  • Beverages (non-alcoholic)
  • Hardware/Home Improvement
  • Fast Food (Quick Service Restaurants)
  • Appliance Manufacturers
  • Health & Beauty
  • Clothing
  • Financial Services
  • IT providers
  • Charitable Organisations
  • Insurance Companies
  • Real Estate Agencies
  • Travel & Tourism

Social Media Monitor pricing is based on the number of brands analysed, at $250 (+GST) per brand, plus $495+GST for industry overview and analysis.

As a introductory special, however, we are making a special offer of just $1595+GST for analysis of up to five brands (this offer applies only until November 30). Additional brands may be included for $220+GST per brand.

If you would like to know more about the Social Media Monitor, email us at [email protected]. Or simply take advantage of our special November offer, only until midnight November 30, by clicking here to pay via PayPal:

sign up now

Full details here: https://socialmedia.org.nz/2017/10/are-you-listening-to-your-customers-and-prospects/

 

OFFER 3: MARKETING INSIGHTS 2018

NZ Marketing Insights 2018

It’s that time again, when we dust off the crystal ball and peer into the future of New Zealand Marketing for the year ahead.

Then we wrap our findings up into a comprehensive slide presentation and make it available for you to present to your clients and colleagues as a preview of what to expect in 2018.

Launch 2018 with a comprehensive presentation to your team or your clients

Our MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2018 presentation (comprising at least 150 slides) will be published in early December. It’s unbranded, for you to present as you see fit to your clients.

This presentation looks ahead at what marketers should expect and plan for in 2018, across a wide variety of industries and technologies — based on local and global trends you may not yet have had the opportunity to examine — turning those forecasts into a comprehensive NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2018 report & slide deck in PowerPoint format (with accompanying notes) – information that you can easily present to your team and your clients, bringing everyone up to speed on the latest New Zealand marketing insights as we accelerate towards 2018.

The NZ MARKETING INSIGHTS FOR 2018” report and slide deck will be available for just $597+GST.

However we have a special pre-publication offer for bookings and payment received by midnight November 30:

Pay just $497+GST and SAVE $100!

Click here to pay by credit card through PayPal:
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=F38UV54BEUHCW

Full details here: https://socialmedia.org.nz/2017/10/marketing-trends-for-2018/

Are You Listening to Your Customers and Prospects?

People have always talked their friends and colleagues, to share their opinions (positive or negative) and to seek or give advice before significant decisions. It used to be face to face, but now the talking is far more likely to take place in social media.

Which is one of the reasons why, in a recent survey of marketers, Social Listening was cited as the single most important trend of the year ahead.

importance-of-social-listening

So are YOU listening to what people are saying on social media?

Why should you? Because, alas, consumers (especially Millennials and Generation X) are far more likely to turn to friends, family, colleagues and even online reviewers for their purchase recommendations. Sorry, marketers, but we did it to ourselves with endless hype, puffery and interruption marketing over far too many years.

trusted-sources

So how can you listen to what consumers are saying in social media?

Well, one possibility (but not for a little while) is to take advantage of Facebook’s newest experiment. Advertising Age reports:

Facebook is experimenting with letting brands study people’s posts and comments on the network in an effort to better inform their marketing.

The beta test, an extension of Facebook’s Audience Insights API marketing tech platform, isn’t expected to be widely available until next year, according to people familiar with the offering who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss something Facebook hasn’t announced yet. Early ad partners, which include top agencies and media companies, are searching Facebook’s vast history of public posts to see what topics, themes, brands and products are being discussed. Users’ identities are withheld.

It’s the first time that Facebook, where room for ads in the main News Feed is almost maxed out, is making it possible for advertisers to mine what users post. The new insights tool could help marketers see the social network in a whole new dimension, and even give them a broader understanding of their businesses, with data that informs them about trends in the industry and the consumer mindset.

“On Facebook, you know everything about a person from their profile, what they liked and who they connect with,” says one agency executive in the test. “But Facebook is not good at knowing what people are saying, what they’re posting.”

Advertisers involved said that Facebook has been taking its time developing the new data products because it’s trying to balance privacy of users with what it can offer marketers.

Alternatively, you could use some of the tools out there like SocialMention, which scours Twitter, Reddit and various websites for any mention of your brand.

Or you might be interested in our newest product, our Social Media Monitor, which is a snapshot of NZ social media activity for the previous month, across Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn, for the major players in a specific industry.

socialmediamonitor-900

The Social Media Monitor reports on:

  • How the major players are using each medium
  • The major themes for the previous month
  • Comparative performances

The Social Media Monitor is intended to be both a record of what’s been happening and a way to identify opportunities for future social media usage.

The data is gathered using various software tools we’ve had developed, and then commentary and observation is added (based on our forty-plus years’ experience in advertising and marketing, working on virtually every business sector).

We’ve developed a prototype report about the banking industry in New Zealand, which you can download here (NB this is a prototype, for demonstration purposes), so only some of the data is real; the rest is placeholding content to illustrate the concept).

banking-social-media-monitor-nz

Social Media Monitor reports can be created for any highly-competitive industry sector in any country. A few other sectors we’ve identified include:

  • Automotive Manufacturers
  • Major Retail Chains
  • Airlines
  • Fuel Companies
  • Power Companies
  • Telecommunications
  • Beverages (non-alcoholic)
  • Hardware/Home Improvement
  • Fast Food (Quick Service Restaurants)
  • Appliance Manufacturers
  • Health & Beauty
  • Clothing
  • Financial Services
  • IT providers
  • Charitable Organisations
  • Insurance Companies
  • Real Estate Agencies
  • Travel & Tourism

Social Media Monitor pricing is based on the number of brands analysed, at $250 (+GST) per brand, plus $495+GST for industry overview and analysis.

As a introductory special for November, however, we are making a special offer of just $1595+GST for analysis of up to five brands (this offer applies only until November 30). Additional brands may be included for $220+GST per brand.

If you would like to know more about the Social Media Monitor, email us at [email protected]. Or simply take advantage of our special offer by clicking here to pay via PayPal:

sign up now

Then we will be in touch to confirm your industry and other requirements.

BILLING OPTIONS
If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit or require an invoice before making payment, please send an email to [email protected] with details of your request. (The service provider will be shown as Netmarketing Services Limited in your transaction and on your credit card statement).

7 Reasons why Social Media Monitoring is Vital for Your Brand

social-media-monitoring

Social Listening (i.e. Social Media Monitoring) has been cited in a recent survey of marketers as THE most important marketing trend of the next 12 months.

importance-of-social-listening

Actually, it’s a topic that’s been of vital importance ever since Social Media Marketing became a thing, and for good reason: consumers, as they do, may well already be talking about you and your brand online, and if you don’t know what they’re saying, they could do significant brand damage.

Here are 7 reasons why Social Media Monitoring is essential.

1 They May Already Be Talking About You, But You Don’t Know It

Fullers Ferries was criticised on Facebook in January 2017 by an unhappy patron (who also happens to be an Auckland city councillor):

When you don't listen for complaints in social media

The post garnered 44 reactions, 25 comments and 1 share. Unfortunately, none of those responses appear to be from anyone working for Fullers — and the tone of the comments is uniformly negative.

The discussion might have been more moderate if a company spokesperson had stepped in and responded to the issues raised. Unfortunately, the opportunity was lost.

2 They Are Talking About You, And You DO Know It

Sometimes, as in the example below, the complaints are directly addressed to the offending company.

when you actively monitor social media for complaints and concerns

If you’re addressed directly in social media (or if your social media monitoring is real-time and picks up a complaint or question), then you need to respond fast — ideally within an hour.

As David Alston of social monitoring software operators Radian6 notes:

Catching something early means getting a chance to show how responsive you are. A complaint is an opportunity to demonstrate problem-solving abilities. A posted complaint may also draw out other comments from people with the same concern, which provides an opportunity to reach out to them as well. And who knows, impressing customer with great customer service may generate some positive posts about how you resolved the problems.

3 You Can Listen for Expressed Needs

Sometimes, consumers will be talking about products or services that they need. If you’ve set up your monitoring keywords and terms correctly, you may be able to get in ahead of your competitors.

need-to-buy

The best way to watch for expressed needs is to look for keywords often used to describe those needs. People shout out what they are doing and ask the general public for advice occasionally when they are about to make a purchase. Both of these situations provide an opportunity to reach out with an offer of assistance or a free demo for example. While this may seem intrusive at first glance consider that great retail clerk who offers to help when you are trying to locate a pair of shoes in your size. A social media poster often appreciates that someone is listening and does not mind an offer of assistance especially if it’s done in a helpful way.

4 You Can Keep Tabs on What’s Trending

Topics will often pop up online that draw huge crowds from a page visits or commenting perspective. There is a lot to be learned in discussion threads especially when they have the potential to affect your brand. Following the swarms can give you a better understanding of current sentiment and thinking towards a certain topic and who the players are that have opinions on it. It also may point out a topic that you will need to monitor going forward. Tracking a topic’s viral nature and how long it lives can give you an idea of its relative importance. You may also decide to participate in the crowd discussion thread early in the process, giving your company exposure to those currently involved in the discussion and to those yet to join.

twitter-trends

You can see what’s trending near you on Twitter, just by visiting the front page of Twitter.com.

 

5 You Can Identify and Monitor Influencers

Influencers within a space can carry a lot of weight. They gain their power either from the number of times they post on a topic, the number of people who link to their posts on a topic, the number of people gathering to comment and how engaged visitors to their posts become. The hive that forms around an influencer helps spread an opinion on a brand faster and that opinion express potentially carries more weight. Often an influencer’s post appears prominently in a topic’s Google search results thus affecting the views of even more potential customers. Knowing who these influencers are and their opinions of your brands helps you determine who to reach out to for help as advocates or to understand why they currently hold a negative view.

shannon

Shannon (Shaaanxo) is a Kiwi influencer with million-plus followings on YouTube and Instagram

 

6 Get Early Warning of Potential Crises

Discussions happening in social media can serve as an early warning system before an issue goes mainstream. By using advanced tools you can observe new words popping more frequently about your brands. If you were an airline, as an example, the sudden appearance of the word “cancellations” along with the words “bad” and “customer service” would immediately trigger a need to drill into the posts driving them. Tracking these “crisis” words over time on a go forward basis would also then help gauge the effectiveness of any outreach campaigns to address the underlying issues.

crisis-early-warning

When prospective customers react this negatively, it’s time to reconsider your policy

 

7 Collect Social Proof

Sometimes, people actually say nice things in social media.

best-restaurant-ever

Compliments can come in many forms. It could be a congratulations message about a recent award. It could be a customer raving about the experience they just had with a product or with customer service. Social media compliments are the online equivalent of those old school references or testimonials of days past. Save all of these compliments in a list for future use. Potential clients looking for reassurance on a purchase decision would love to see what others think of your company and products.

 

What to Do When Things Go Bad

Even when you get into Reputation Management proactively, it won’t always go smoothly. Marty Weintraub, President of aimClear Search Marketing Agency, captured the moment in a presentation entitled “The Dark Side of Reputation Management”:

  • Expect to make mistakes. First, any active social marketer can expect to make mistakes which cost sleep, cause angst, and alienate others—it’s the reality of the game. Subscribe to the theory that “nothing ventured is nothing gained” and forgive yourself in advance for inevitable screw-ups. Social media is just that: social. Humans tend to be unpredictable, especially in groups. Anyone who dives into social media without accepting that the results will be a mixed-bag-learning-curve risks being prematurely discouraged at inevitable rejection. Hell, several record companies said “no” to Elvis. Not everyone is going to love you.
  • Do not lose your cool (or, stupid is as stupid does). This can’t be stressed enough. No matter what the appropriate PR crises response turns out to be, there is seldom equity in hasty emotional comebacks. It rarely works to respond during the heat of anger, so get a grip. When rejected, it’s normal to feel hurt, anger, sadness, and even rage. Count to 350, wait until tomorrow, eat some comfort food, or find another way to chill out..
    Not a good idea:
    belgian-beer-cafeIt’s true that some disasters require an immediate online response, but these instances are truly rare. There’s nearly always 5 minutes or 2 hours available to wait without impacting the ultimate outcome. Pay attention to emotional red flags and be the most mature party at the table.
  • Fight fire with water, not fire. When some social media twit unfairly flames your company (or you personally), it’s tempting to nuke them. As professional marketers we usually know the forums to post to, blogs to comment in, and have a good understanding of what it might take to completely trash someone in revenge. As human beings, we’re wired to defend the home turf by any means possible. That said, take a moment to distinguish the degree of response necessary. Fight the heat rising off the back your neck whilst your ears turn red and ask if a “high road” response will suffice in this situation.Often we advise clients to actually thank the flamer for initiating what could become a productive dialogue. There’s very little comeback for the provocateur if his or her rant is met with the response, “Thank you for the insight. We appreciate you raising your concern.” We’ve seen multiple cases where this tactic converts the provocateur to a friend. Online or off, this approach is a timeless technique for dealing with angry customers.
  • Don’t anger the natives. Preempt debacles by holistically participating wherever online networking takes you. Many—OK, most—passionate social community members either dislike or downright hate marketers. Their concerns are valid in many cases. Be a responsible social media marketer instead.Reckless or selfish marketers dilute the neighborhood content stream, wrecking it for everybody. This common phenomenon particularly irks long term tagging and bookmarking site users. Be cognizant of the norms. Give exponentially more than you take. Respect the indigenous cultural and join in to preserve what’s best about the community. Give a hoot—don’t content pollute.Never spam.Don’t bash the hornets’ nest (i.e., intentionally provoke). I should take my own advice about this one and will vouch for the fact that troll hunting makes for excellent sport. Don’t do it. One obvious method for avoiding a fight is not to start one. Taking the initiative to preemptively attack someone who hasn’t bothered you is an unfortunate tactic favored by losers.
  • Get input from others. It’s uncanny how approachable the “stars” in our business are to unknowns in need. I actually approached Danny Sullivan (a leading US Search Engine & Social Marketing guru), as I had heard him speak on this topic. He was completely unselfish and helpful in bringing the entire affair into perspective. I learned a thing or two about the mutually supportive qualities of our community. I have never met a competent social media expert who was unavailable to a respectful approach seeking insight in a difficult situation. When you’re in over your head, get advice from a master.
  • Don’t try to save the world if the injustice does not really matter. Get over it. It’s not your place to solve all the injustices on this green earth. Saving the planet is a time consuming endeavour and should only be partaken in the rarest of circumstances.
  • Cast your ego aside. A savvy lawyer gave me incredibly useful advice at my wedding. He said, “When my wife and I disagree, I tell her that she ‘might’ be right.” He pointed out that responding with a non-binding statement ceding to the other’s perspective really gives nothing away at all except respect. Success and peace is what matters, not who’s right.When you are attacked in social media and every fiber in your body wants to throttle someone because they’re so totally wrong, check your ego and take a breath. It doesn’t matter if your side “wins” if the flamers have already burnt your reputation down. It’s rather difficult to unring a bell.
  • Pre-plan to deal with crisis & opportunity. Ideally, it’s best to have a contingency plan in place for when things hit the fan. We teach clients to create a designated PR council, of which we’re a member. Depending on the size of your organization, this could be as basic as running the situation by your spouse or as complex as assembling the board of directors. Regardless of what’s appropriate in your situation, think ahead and have your resources lined up and ready to go.Out there on the street, there’s a palpable fear of user-generated media. Most marketers understand that at least some component of their marketing mix may indeed be somehow rooted in social media. A commitment to preemptive and responsive tactics to deal with negativity can be essential to overcoming apprehension.

We do offer a Social Media Monitoring service, to a limited number of clients. If you’d like to talk to us about your social media monitoring needs, drop us an email in the first instance to [email protected].

 

How Social Media Monitoring Can Improve Your Sales

By now, most marketers understand that it’s a good idea to monitor what’s being said about you in social media, for self-protection at least. How can you know if your brand or company is being trashed online, so that you can take appropriate remedial action, if you’re not listening?

Now an article from Contently highlights some of the other ways in which Social Media Monitoring can directly help your business:

What happens when a minor TV character get major social attention? In the digital age, how do you take advantage of it and adjust? That was the challenge faced by BET [Television] Network’s Being Mary Jane.

The show’s Twitter analysis showed that an unexpected character was emerging as a fan favourite: Avery, the wife scorned by the affair between Mary Jane and her husband. It was too late to reshoot the series, but the fans’ love forced BET to rethink its social media strategy and the way it was promoting the show.

It all began around the time the series premiered in January 2013. JP Lespinasse, BET’s senior director of social media, got a shiny new toy: Adobe Social, a social media management and analytics tool that he began using to monitor the chatter around Being Mary Jane.

Two shows into the eight-episode series, an intriguing insight emerged. While of course the romantically challenged Mary Jane herself got the most attention, the Twitter analysis showed that Avery garnered the next highest number of mentions.

“The next step was, let’s see where we can begin to amp up our coverage of Avery from a content perspective,” Lespinasse recalls. BET recut some of its broadcast commercials to feature Avery more. They also gave her more visibility on the show’s website and digital promotions, and recruited the actress who plays Mary Jane, Robinne Lee, to live tweet the episodes that featured her character.

When the social media staff used their human brains to parse the social media chatter, they gleaned another useful insight into just why Avery appealed so much to the audience. “There were a lot of people quoting her,” Lespinasse says. “The stuff that made Avery resonate was the stuff that came out of her mouth. So, not only do we want to feature her generally, we want to feature what she’s saying.”

So how did the BET social media team glean these insights? They began their social listening program two weeks before the premiere. Then, every morning after the show aired, they’d peruse the analytics. They also produced weekly reports charting the total audience against social media mentions.

Most of us don’t have TV shows in our product portfolio, but any brand promoting its wares to a public audience (whether B2C or B2B) should have a social media monitoring strategy that reports on what’s being said about the brand online.

By actively listening, you can identify any problems and concerns, of course, but the monitoring process can also highlight:

  • product features that particularly appeal to your customers
  • unexpected uses for your product that might create future opportunities
  • category problems that consumers have but that your product could solve

In the latter case, social media monitoring provider Infoglutton gives an example of how monitoring can improve product design:

We ran InfoGlutton to monitor problems people are expressing about espresso machines. Here’s two mentions we found out today on Twitter:

espresso

Joe Hall, writing at SearchEngineLand, provides a useful protocol for turning social media monitoring into effective new product design:

funnel

Recommended Monitoring Tools

So how can you listen effectively without the process taking up too much time? At a minimum, you should:

  • Sign yourself up to Google Alerts for your company name, products, executives or brand terms so that you’re alerted by email whenever your name pops up online. To do so, enter your search terms and select to receive updates as they happen.

    alerts
    Choose “As-it-happens” and “All results”

  • Check Twitter for chatter about your company or brand. Use tools like TweetBeep or Twitter Search to monitor conversations about your company in real-time.
  • Get email notifications for specific search phrases on Facebook through Hyperalerts.
  • (B2B) Join a few LinkedIn groups to which your key customers and prospects belong. Search for questions or comments that you or members of your company can address.
  • Get yourself up to speed with RSS readers and use Feedly to check Flickr, Delicious, Digg and others