Tag Archives: care

7 Obvious Signs That Your Organisation Needs Social Media Training

Time and again, we’ve seen that Social Media amplifies – sometimes for good, too often for bad or worse. Say something stupid in social media and there’s a better than even chance that the whole world will find out about it, far sooner than you think.

There’s really only one solution (and even that’s not guaranteed): learn what you should and shouldn’t say on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, LinkedIn and all those other social networks. Get some training before it’s too late.

So how do you know if you need social media training?

If your organisation exhibits any of these classic errors.

7 Obvious Signs That Your Organisation Needs Social Media Training

Social Media Warning Signs

Get yourself social media training fast if your business makes any of these mistakes:

1. Asking open-ended questions (and then ignoring the responses)

2. Getting into an argument and insulting your customers and followers

It was the customer service disaster heard around the Internet. An Arizona restaurateur, fed up after years of negative online reviews and an embarrassing appearance on a reality television show, posted a social media rant laced with salty language and angry, uppercase letters that quickly went viral, to the delight of people who love a good Internet meltdown.

Amy & The Cakes #fail

 

3. Not replying to questions and comments on your social media platforms.

Too many brands simply ignore what’s being said to them, with entirely predictable results. This graph from SocialBakers shows which industries are the best (and worst) at responding:

social media responses by industry

 

4. All you talk about in social media is yourself

Only 10% of what you talk about in social media should be yourself and your own products or services. The rest of your discussions should be about things that matter to your followers. Don’t be like this Donut shop, constantly posting meaningless pictures of donuts and drinks to an audience that couldn’t care less (3416 followers but less than a dozen likes per image).

donut posts that nobody cares about

 

5. Nobody’s talking about you

As you may have heard, Facebook is dialing back its organic reach. What that means, in a nutshell, is that even if someone likes your Facebook brand page, it’s most unlikely that they will see your posts in their newsfeed. That means, to all intents and purposes, that you’re invisible to your followers — unless (a) you promote your posts to them; or (b) you write posts that are sufficiently interesting and engaging that they get shared by the few that do see them (and thus get out to a wider audience).

The Star Wars page on Facebook, for example, despite 11 million followers, was only averaging around 15,000 weekly talks — until May the Fourth (“be with you”), when interest surged and more than a quarter of a million people found Star Wars worth talking about again on Facebook.

May the Fourth Be With You

 

6. Everybody’s talking about you (but not in a good way)

Justine Sacco, head of public relations for UK media giant IAC, flew towards Africa in December 2013, blissfully unaware of the uproar caused by her final tweet before boarding her 12-hour flight.

Justine Sacco

Even though Ms Sacco had a mere 200 followers, the tweet went viral even while she was flying. Her tweet was universally condemned as racist, resulting in the hashtag #HasJustineLandedYet trending worldwide. Unsurprisingly, Ms Sacco lost her job, her former employer apologised profusely and several AIDS charities received donations from appalled twitterati.

 

7. You post too often (or too seldom)

How often should you post to your social networks? That depends on (a) your networks; and (b) your followers.

If you’re posting to Twitter, for example, and reaching out to a business audience, then posting (variations on the same information) at three-hour intervals during the business day is acceptable — very few will see more than one post, given the transient nature of Twitter.

On the other hand, posting to a consumer audience via Facebook should be less frequent, because posts are likely to linger more there. Take a look at your Facebook page Insights data (via your Page Manager dashboard) and view “When Your Fans Are Online” (under “Posts”).

when your fans are online

Post perhaps twice a day, at times that coincide with most of your fans being online.

fans online

 

Once you realise you need Social Media Training

We would be remiss if we didn’t point you to our range of social media courses: overview here.

  • If you want a comprehensive overview of Social Media Marketing, its principles and its practices, start here
  • If you want a rundown of the latest developments, check out our Advanced Social Media Marketing course here
  • If you want to market your business on Facebook but don’t know how, our Complete Facebook Marketing course is the place to start
  • If you’re already active on Facebook but think you could be doing it better, our Facebook Accelerator course could be the one for you
  • If you operate in the B2B space, we strongly recommend you learn How To Use LinkedIn Effectively
  • If you plan to use social media but won’t be hands-on yourself, you should take a look at our course covering How To Prepare An Effective Social Media Brief

LinkedIn Adds Showcase Pages

LinkedIn continues to work on expanding its revenue potential beyond the recruitment industry, an evolution which we encourage and support — in our view, LinkedIn offers far, far more than just a place to strut your stuff in front of prospective employers.

In this latest development, announced earlier this week, LinkedIn has added a new facility to its Company pages — the ability to add up to 10 free Showcase Pages which (as the name suggests) allow companies to showcase specific products and services.

Yes, you can already have separate product or service pages linked to your Company page, but these new Showcase pages offer two significantly different features:

  1. Showcase pages attract their own individual followings — they do not inherit any followers from their parent Company pages. For some, that may seem like a negative (“you mean, I’ve put all this effort into building up a following for my company page, now I have to do the same for each individual Showcase page?”), but the reality is that if you provide several products or services that appeal to different target markets, then each product/service can have its own Showcase page with its followers.For example, we’ve just launched a new Mobile Marketing course (details here, if you’re interested: http://mobilemarketing.ac.nz/ecourses), which may not appeal to the same people who are interested in our Social Media or eCommerce courses. We can now encourage those interested in Mobile Marketing to follow our new Mobile Marketing showcase page on LinkedIn.
    .
  2. Showcase pages have their own Status Update facility. This is the key element that makes Showcase pages worthwhile — you can now post updates specific to an individual product or service (or even topic), and only reach those people who are interested in that topic.Using our Mobile Marketing example again: we can now post mobile-related updates to our Mobile Marketing showcase page followers, without bothering those interested only in social media.

So how do you create Showcase pages?

Glad you asked. First, you must be an Administrator of a Company Page, because all Showcase pages are linked to Company pages.

Secondly, note that the Showcase pages are rolling out around the world this week, so the facility may not be enabled on your page yet (if not, check back again in a day or so).

With those caveats out of the way, head to your Company page — and in particular to the “Edit” button on the right hand side of your Company page. You’ll find the “Create a Showcase page” option at the bottom of the accompanying dropdown menu:

showcase1

Select that option.

You’ll be prompted to create a title for your Showcase page, and also (optionally) to add Administrators:

showcase2

A couple of points to note on page title creation:

  • The words you choose for your title will also become the permalink for your Showcase page (for example, our selected words above meant that the address for our new page is http://www.linkedin.com/company/the-principles-&-practice-of-mobile-marketing). This has the usual implications for being found in the LinkedIn search engine and via Google, so choose carefully. (NB: LinkedIn advise that they’re not currently offering customizable URLs for Showcase pages, but are exploring the opportunity have this feature available in the future. )
  • The title words you choose will also appear over your main image, so shorter is better (we went back and shortened our title once we’d seen what happened to our image). However, if you want to benefit from the longer title in the search engines, you can always edit your title later, as we did.

Next, you’ll be taken to the main Edit page, for you to add:

  • a main image (LinkedIn calls it a “hero” image) — this image is not currently clickable
  • a short description (at least 75 characters but no more than 200 characters in total)
  • a small logo and an even smaller square logo
  • a website URL where Showcase page visitors can go for more information

showcase3

If you think this is minimalist, so do we. Still, the main point of this page is to serve as a rallying point for tightly-targeted updates, so don’t be too perturbed that you can’t include very much on your Showcase pages.

Here are the specs for the images:

  • Hero Image: Minimum 974 x 330 pixels. PNG, JPEG, or GIF. Maximum file size 2 MB. You can crop your image once it’s uploaded.
  • Logo: 100 x 60 pixels. Image will be resized to fit.
  • Square logo: 50 x 50 pixels. Image will be resized to fit.

The process for uploading images is simple enough: click on “Add Image” and follow the instructions, cropping your image as necessary.

showcase4

Do the same for the logos (which will show up in your updates and search results).

showcase5

Add in the URL for the website page related to this specific product. You can also choose an industry category for this page (which need not be the same as the category of your Company page) and decide whether or not to display other Showcase pages related to your company.

showcase6

Once you’ve finished filling out all these details, click on “Publish” and check out the results:

showcase7

As we said, minimalist. But it’s what you do next that counts:

  1. Start creating highly-targeted status updates
  2. Invite relevant LinkedIn contacts to follow you

Got it? Good. Then start creating those Showcase pages. Just remember, though: only create pages that you can feed with highly-targeted content, otherwise you’re just wasting your time.

Most Talked About NZ Facebook Pages – August 2013

If you’ve taken any of our Social Media courses, you’ll know that we keep harping on about Engagement — creating content that your followers want to talk about and share with their friends.

We thought it was time once again to check out which Kiwi Facebook pages are the most engaging right now, as at 19 August 2o13. We’ve sliced and diced the numbers two ways, firstly measuring Engagement as a percentage of Page Likes and secondly in terms of total volume.

Leading the first list by a country mile: Made4Baby.

made4baby

This Kiwi brand, which provides natural skincare for babies & children, has only 2,457 Likes but was talked about by 14,300 last week, representing 584.2% Engagement — nearly six times as many people talking about the Facebook page as it has followers.

And the most talked-about post? This one, on August 6:

dirtydishes

This image attracted 286 likes and a staggering 7,393 shares — the sentiment too good not to spread. Clearly Made4Baby understands its audience!

What other New Zealand Facebook pages got people talking? Here’s our Top 10 list:

Most Engaged NZ Facebook Pages August 2013
Engagement as a percentage of Page Likes

Page Name Likes Talking Engagement %
1 Made4Baby 2,448 14,300 584.2%
2 Kaukapakapa Veterinary Services. 55 176 320.0%
3 Shed 10 36 68 188.9%
4 TripMe.co.nz 618 1,139 184.3%
5 Deborah Quin 259 403 155.6%
6 The Factory 570 763 133.9%
7 The Natural Parent Magazine 41,718 55,002 131.8%
8 nzblokes.co.nz 38,527 47,232 122.6%
9 O’Neill New Zealand 587 634 108.0%
10 Dairy Womens Network 1,107 1,123 101.4%

On the other hand, if we just look at the total numbers talking about Facebook pages, these are the Top Ten:

Most Engaged NZ Facebook Pages August 2013
Highest Numbers of People Talking About The Page

Page Name Likes Talking About Engagement %
1 All Blacks 2,016,724 101,459 5.0%
2 The Natural Parent Magazine 41,718 55,002 131.8%
3 nzblokes.co.nz 38,527 47,232 122.6%
4 Paw Justice 268,229 28,398 10.6%
5 Flight of the Conchords 1,626,814 24,782 1.5%
6 Made4Baby 2,448 14,300 584.2%
7 Air New Zealand 647,475 13,710 2.1%
8 Tip Top Ice Cream 129,218 13,560 10.5%
9 Vodafone Warriors 107,180 13,416 12.5%
10 Peter Jackson 1,029,657 13,327 1.3%

NB: We’ve discarded a few pages which were Australia/New Zealand pages (eg BlackBerry Australia/New Zealand) or which were parent/child pages (eg Nissan NZ, where reported Likes and Talking About statistics were cumulative totals of all official Nissan pages globally).

Source of this analysis: the 19 August 2013 edition of our own Netmarketing Courses database of more than 31,000 NZ Facebook pages, for which we gather updated data weekly.

Why “Seeking New Opportunity” Doesn’t Work On LinkedIn

You’ve probably come across the phrase “seeking new opportunity” on LinkedIn. It’s a common euphemism for “I’m looking for a job“.

It’s a comfortable description. The only problem is that doesn’t work — at least, not in terms of getting the opportunity-seeking you in front of the people doing any hiring.

Why not?

In a word: keywords.

LinkedIn, with hundreds of millions of resumes on its books in the form of member profiles, uses keywords to guide the listings it promotes to the top of the results in response to any search.

Recruiters and prospective employers quickly learn to search through LinkedIn using keywords related to the job they’re offering, in combination with Location and (sometimes) industry. “Seeking” “new” and “opportunity” are seldom among those keywords.

So your headline, which is one of the five key places which LinkedIn searches for relevant keywords, needs to include keywords that are:

  • relevant to the job you’re seeking
  • reflect the words typically used to describe the desired skills and attributes of the sought-after role
  • and ideally provide an Added Value benefit for a new employer

What do  we mean by “Added Value benefit”?

As Dan Sherman, author of “Maximum Success With LinkedIn” notes:

In your headline, say what you are looking for but say it in a way that adds value to any company that hires you.

Let’s face it: recruiters and hiring managers only care about what you can do for them, so broadcast it in your headline.

Write: “Actively seeking an opportunity to bring my extensive sales leadershp experience to increase profits.” Or: “Pursuing an engineering opportunity to write code for the next big Internet success story.”

There’s a whole lot more that you need to do to your LinkedIn profile to help you find jobs on LinkedIn, but this is one of the most important, so if you currently use the offending “Seeking New Opportunities” headline, start thinking about relevant keywords instead.

What else can you do? Check out our online training course that will show you how to really use LinkedIn effectively.

linkedin-banner

LinkedIn operates the world’s largest professional network on the Internet with (as of January 2017) more than 467 million members in over 200 countries and territories.

Yet far too many of those members simply don’t know how to use LinkedIn effectively to promote themselves or their organisations.

In response to this need, we’ve developed a course that will show you how to use LinkedIn to best advantage, taking account of the developments being rolled out regularly by the LinkedIn team.

About the Course

This is a seven-part online training course providing a comprehensive introduction to LinkedIn, from the Basics to detailed instructions on how to use LinkedIn to promote your organisation, build your personal reputation and even make sales.

This online training course is conducted on a web-based e-learning software platform, enabling course participants to proceed at their own pace, accessing materials online. This particular online training course provides content in a variety of multimedia forms, including videos, slideshows, flash-based presentations and PDF files. No special software is required to participate.

Course lessons will be provided in seven parts, for participants to access in accordance with their own timetables. Interaction with the course tutor is enabled through the platform software tools (with telephone backup if required).

Feedback from those who have previously taken one of our courses:

  • “this was the best professional development course I have done in many years” – Mark R, senior Agency Exec responsible for social media
  • “thought the information within was outstanding” – Ed P, General Manager
  • “What I loved was that I started with a fairly rudimentary understanding of social media but have learned a lot – including where to find more information as I need it.” – Fiona W, Marketing Manager
  • “I found it relevant, informative, topical, insightful and a bloody good read. It’s never evangelical, too techy, patronising, assumes that you know too much or too little about digital and has a warm sense of humour in the communication throughout which helped faciliate the learning process for me.” — Adrienne B, new media senior executive
  • “Am thoroughly enjoying the content!” – Kara B, magazine co-ordinator
  • “I completed the first lesson today and found it really interesting and love the interaction already! I am so looking forward to the second lesson already …” — Annette B, public relations director

COURSE CREATION AND TUTORING
This “How to use LinkedIn Effectively” programme has been created and is tutored by Michael Carney. Michael has been in the marketing game since 1971, online since 1987 and keeps tabs on a wide range of trends and developments, locally and around the world. He is the author of “Trade Me Success Secrets” (now in its Second Edition) and a regular magazine columnist. Michael is also the creator of a number of online training courses, covering social media, eCommerce and other aspects of digital marketing.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE “HOW TO USE LINKEDIN EFFECTIVELY” COURSE

Any business professional who wants to master LinkedIn, whether to further their own career or to develop their business presence on the world’s leading Social B2B network.

COURSE CONTENTS

Lesson One: How To Set Yourself Up Effectively On LinkedIn

You’re probably one of the millions who already have a profile on LinkedIn — but is it just a transplanted CV? We show you how to turn your basic profile into a living, selling document that:

  • showcases your unique talents and experience to best advantage
  • reinforces your personal brand with a compelling headline that’s the first thing any visitor will see
  • highlights your achievements, not just your history
  • provides a platform for your future success

Lesson One also covers:

  • The most effective ways to ask for recommendations and endorsements
  • How to use the principle of Reciprocity to sharpen your profile
  • Trojan Horse Marketing and how it can really work for you
  • How to claim your name on LinkedIn (and why it matters)
  • How to optimize your profile for SEO
  • How to use LinkedIn’s Mobile Apps and how you can ensure that your profile stands out on every platform
  • The power of an effective profile summary
  • How to re-shape your profile to make it sizzle (and show off your best bits)

Lesson Two: How To Use LinkedIn For Business

Once you have your own personal profile up and sizzling, it’s time to turn your attention to your organisation (especially if you operate in the B2B space). LinkedIn has now surpassed Twitter as the most popular social medium for distributing B2B content, with 83% of B2B marketers using LinkedIn to promote their organisations. So where do you begin? We start with Company Pages (which were recently redesigned to make it easier for LinkedIn users to find, follow and engage with companies of interest).

Topics covered in Lesson Two include:

  • How to use LinkedIn Banner Images to showcase your company brand and really bring your page to life
  • How to attract keen followers to your company pages (and what that does for your organisation’s visibility on LinkedIn)
  • What you can now say about your company’s products and services
  • How to harness social proof to best effect
  • Why you must make your updates valuable, relevant and interesting (and what that really means)

Lesson Three: How To Use LinkedIn To Find A Job

You’ve probably heard that LinkedIn is very useful when you’re looking for a new job — but where do you start?

In Lesson Three, we talk about:

  • How to use LinkedIn to get the word out that you’re in the market
  • How to polish your LinkedIn profile even further, to highlight your best (and most employable) characteristics
  • How to find out where people with your skillset are working
  • How to check if a company is still hiring
  • How to identify new recruits (and perhaps pick their brains)
  • How to find out who’s who in your target industry
  • How to network shamelessly to future-proof your career
  • How to build your personal brand
  • How to enhance your Resume with LinkedIn Testimonials
  • How to find (and capitalise on) inside connections at potential employers
  • How to search the hidden job market for opportunities
  • How to use LinkedIn to prepare for your job interview

Lesson Four: How To Use LinkedIn To Generate Business

Can you actually use LinkedIn to create business? Yes, indeed you can, and we’ll show you how. Along the way, we’ll talk about:

  • How to use LinkedIn to find business opportunities
  • How to Use LinkedIn Groups to build relationships with prospects and attract new leads
  • How to decide who you should connect with (and who doesn’t make the cut)
  • The power of a clear Call To Action
  • LinkedIn Special Offers (and where it’s appropriate to make them)
  • How LinkedIn’s Advanced People Search feature can be your very best prospecting friend
  • How to use LinkedIn for sales success

Lesson Five: How To Use LinkedIn ‘s Paid Services

You’ve probably noticed that, whilst many of LinkedIn’s services are free, you are occasionally encouraged to buy some stuff there. Reportedly, around 2% of LinkedIn members have paid-for subscriptions. So should you dip into your pocket?

In Lesson Six, we evaluate the pros and cons of:

  • LinkedIn paid advertising — how it works, what you can expect to pay and what results to aim for
  • The surprising response rates of LinkedIn InMails (and when using them is worthwhile)
  • How to use LinkedIn’s Profile Organizer
  • The LinkedIn paid account options and what they provide

Lesson Six: How To Use LinkedIn To Promote Your Business

So far we’ve looked at how to use LinkedIn to make sales and build your reputation. But LinkedIn is also an ideal vehicle for promoting your organisation to other businesses.

In Lesson Six we’ll look at the promotional potential of LinkedIn, including:

  • How (and how often) to craft status updates that will appeal to your target customers and clients
  • Best practices for sending out mass messages and invitations (without being a pest)
  • How to use Groups to build your authority and keep in regular touch with your prospects
  • How to connect from LinkedIn to the rest of the web, using widgets and plugins and other automated services
  • How to share useful articles and resources without overdoing it
  • How to add videos and presentations to LinkedIn
  • How to use the right tools to manage your LinkedIn content to avoid getting overwhelmed

Lesson Seven: How To Use LinkedIn For Recruiting

We’ve already covered using LinkedIn to find a new job. In Lesson Seven we look at the flip side of the coin — how to use LinkedIn to find the most appropriate candidates for vacancies within your organisation.

In this lesson, we consider:

  • why LinkedIn is a fertile ground within which to find perhaps 80% of your prospective employees
  • How to use LinkedIn to tap into the most effective recruiting source of all
  • The crowd-sourced accuracy of LinkedIn profiles
  • LinkedIn’s job-posting facilities (and whether you should use them)
  • Soliciting introductions: the appropriate protocols
  • How to use LinkedIn to search and compare

TIMING

The next “How To Use LinkedIn Effectively” course begins on Monday 08 May, 2017.

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INVESTMENT

This seven-part online training course is available for $497 +GST. However we offer an Early Bird Discount of $100 — the course is just $397 +GST for bookings made and payment received by Monday 01 May, 2017.

Bookings are confirmed on receipt of payment, which can be by bank deposit or credit card. We can raise an invoice in advance if you need it.

To reserve your place in our “How To Use LinkedIn Effectively” course, please pay by credit card through PayPal by clicking here.

Register Now for the next course

If you would prefer to pay by cheque or bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

You’ll receive our emailed confirmation of your booking. Then on the first day of the course we’ll follow up with details of your Login and Password, along with an Enrolment Key for the “How To Use LinkedIn Effectively” online training course.

If you have any questions, or would like more information, please email us at [email protected]