Tag Archives: confirmation

Latest NZ Social Media Statistics

If there was any doubt about the spread of social media in New Zealand, the release by Statistics New Zealand of the findings of the 2012 Household Use of Information and Communication Technology study should quickly put to any concerns to rest.

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Two out of every three of the 2.8 million New Zealanders Over 15 who went online between December 2011 and September 2012 accessed social networks, according to the report. Think of that result as cumulative social media reach.

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These numbers will come as no surprise to those who have been following social media regularly, but consider them official confirmation.

If you’re wondering exactly which social networks were worthy of Kiwi attention in 2012, Nielsen Online Ratings data from December 2012 can answer that question:

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Not much of a race. Since it slipped past Bebo and took over as the Number 1 New Zealand Social Media destination in April 2009, Facebook has gone from strength to strength in this country (as, indeed, it has elsewhere on the planet).

Younger users may gripe that the site is no longer cool (now their parents and grandparents are on Facebook), but so far there are no meaningful alternatives. For now, at least, long live the king!

  • If you’d like to know more about Social Media in New Zealand (and how to use it effectively to market your organisation), check out our courses.

For other data from the Statistics New Zealand survey (specifically, the latest NZ ecommerce statistics, with details of how many Kiwis are now shopping online), please refer to the article on our eCommerce.org.nz resource site.

 

Timeless Social Media Insights

One of the more interesting stories of the week comes courtesy of the Harvard Business Review, which reveals that many of today’s oh-so-awesome social media insights actually track their provenance back to a 1966 study on word of mouth by Ernest Dichter, who HBR describes as “the father of motivation research”.

Some key insights gleaned by HBR from that nearly fifty-year-old study:

A major Dichter finding, very relevant today, was the identification of four motivations for a person to communicate about brands:

The first (about 33% of the cases) is because of product-involvement. The experience is so novel and pleasurable that it must be shared.

The second (about 24%) is self-involvement. Sharing knowledge or opinions is a way to gain attention, show connoisseurship, feel like a pioneer, have inside information, seek confirmation of a person’s own judgment, or assert superiority.

The third (around 20%) is other-involvement. The speaker wants to reach out and help to express neighborliness, caring, and friendship.

The fourth (around 20%) is message-involvement. The message is so humorous or informative that it deserves sharing.

We can’t say we’re surprised that these insights were coined so long ago — human nature doesn’t change all that much. If we made the effort, we daresay we’d find similar threads woven through essays by classical Greek and Roman philosophers as well.

Plus ça change …