Tag Archives: Facebook data

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Atlas by Facebook

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Facebook is relaunching its Atlas advertising programme, enabling marketers to tap into its treasure trove of consumer data. Re/Code explains:

  • Facebook is reintroducing Atlas, the underused platform it bought from Microsoft last year.
  • Facebook says Atlas can help marketers track the effectiveness of their ads around the Web; it also says it will allow them to buy ads on non-Facebook websites and apps, using Facebook targeting data.
  • Facebook makes a point of saying these ads aren’t “Facebook ads.” But it is also playing up the notion that the ads marketers buy via Atlas will be more effective than other big ad platforms, because they use Facebook’s data.
  • Facebook says it is working with lots of partners, but so far has named only two. Ad holding giant Omnicom, which already has deals with Facebook, Google, Twitter and most other big digital players, says it will buy ads with Atlas. Facebook’s Instagram will also work with the platform. The most tantalizing notion I’ve heard this week is that Facebook has talked to Twitter about joining up, and that the idea remains a possibility.
  • What’s that? You’re worried about people using your Facebook data to serve you ads? Facebook says you shouldn’t worry, because your identity will remain anonymous to advertisers and publishers — they’ll just know some basic facts about you. But really, if you’re worried about this kind of thing you shouldn’t be on Facebook. Actually, the whole Web is probably a no-go zone for you. Sorry.

From a marketer’s perspective, the Atlas initiative is an inevitable development, as Facebook attempts to out-monetise Google.

As Pando notes, there’s another important side-effect to the Atlas initiative, as the world goes mobile:

Atlas solves a technical problem that has frustrated advertisers since consumers flocked to mobile devices: the inability to see how ads viewed on one device influence purchases made on other devices because digital “cookies,” the Web’s little stalkers, can’t track smartphone activity.

Check out the video, and check out Atlas, coming soon to a marketer near you.

NZ’s Top 50 Facebook Pages September 2012

There’s a bit of a debate raging over at Stop Press about the validity or otherwise of the latest NZ Facebook data released by Social Bakers. In particular, one commenter noted that “Socialbakers only tracks 131 brand pages in New Zealand”.

We took the opportunity to crunch our own numbers — we have a rather larger sample, of some 6,250 New Zealand Facebook pages — and came up with our own sets of results.

First, we took a look at the Top 50 Most “Liked” New Zealand Facebook Pages. Here are the Top Twenty as at today, September 12 2012 (you’ll be able to download the Top 50 in PDF form at the end of this article):

Yes, we know there are some debatable entries in there. For example, Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit probably don’t rank as truly NZ pages, and the Rugby World Cup, formerly administered by NZ, has now gone troppo. Even so, there’s plenty of useful information for those of a statistical bent, especially with the Top 50 Reports (see below).

The second set of numbers we examined: Facebook’s “Talking About” metric. Here are the Top Twenty Pages that attracted the most “talking” (which includes liking, commenting and sharing) as reported on September 12 2o12:

And the third set of numbers we reviewed: the percentage of those “Engaged” with the page (which we’ve defined as “the number of Talks as a percentage of the total number of Likes”). As you’ll see below, the first 15 pages on our list actually have more people Talking About them than have Liked them (see last month’s Wanganui Chronicle blog post for an extreme example of this phenomenon).

And here’s the link to the PDF file containing the three sets of Top 50 Lists, with our compliments.

PS Our research sample of 6250 NZ Facebook pages is pretty comprehensive, but we’re sure we’ve missed our fair share. If you know of an NZ Facebook page whose performance would put it into one of our Top 50 lists, please let us know in the comments and we’ll add it to our database.