Category Archives: 2017

Marketing Insights NZ 2017 Presentation Series

Following on from the success of our Marketing Insights for 2017 trends presentation (which is still available here), we’re launching a new monthly Marketing Insights NZ 2017 Presentation Series which focusses in on some of the hottest and most important NZ marketing topics and trends for 2017, 2018 and beyond.

marketing-insights-2017-nz-presentation-series

These presentations look ahead at what marketers should expect and plan for in 2017 and 2018 — based on local and global trends you may not yet have had the opportunity to examine — turning those forecasts into a comprehensive report & slide deck in PowerPoint format (with accompanying notes) – information that you can easily present to your team and your clients, bringing everyone up to speed on the latest New Zealand Marketing Insights as we accelerate through 2017.  All presentations are unbranded, so you can add your own branding and comments.

Each presentation consists of at least 150 slides, dealing with as many key insights.

We’ve settled on six of the most important topics of the year ahead, starting with a comprehensive look at the New Zealand consumer:

1 NZ Consumer Trends 2017 (to be published May 2017)

consumer-trends-nz-2017

This presentation starts with a helicopter-level overview of the New Zealand consumer, drawing on local research to get an understanding of current Kiwi demographics, interests and behaviours.

Then, based on McKinsey research, we explore the dynamics (and the marketing implications) of five prevailing forces that are likely to have a lasting impact on Kiwis over the next few years — and which you need to factor into your marketing plans:

  • the changing face of the consumer
  • evolving geopolitical dynamics
  • new patterns of personal consumption
  • technological advancements
  • structural industry shifts

From there, we turn our attention to some of the specific trends influencing NZ consumer behaviour today. Here are just a few of the key issues covered in this Consumer Trends presentation:

The Longevity Economy
We’ve been warned about it for what seems like a very long time. Now it’s here: the baby boomer age wave has finally arrived, bringing with it all sorts of changes, not just for that generation but also for their children and grandchildren (and, needless to say, for marketers as well).

Kids in Charge
At the other end of the spectrum, we see younger children having a much greater influence on the household and its purchasing behaviours. What are the implications for your carefully crafted brand persuasion campaigns?

If They Don’t Know You By Now
One of the unintended consequences of the carefully curated, infinitely personalised Internet experience is that, as MINTEL notes, “many consumers find themselves in a perpetual cycle of being exposed only to ideas, beliefs, opinions and services with which they already identify“. When search results, social media posts and video suggestions are all tailored “just for you”, you’re unlikely to be served serendipitous content that doesn’t reflect your worldview. That’s true of brands and marketing messages as well. So how do you break through and get noticed?

Right Here, Right Now
Kiwi consumers, in common with their peers in other parts of the world, have moved to an expectation of instant gratification. With their trusty smart phones in their pockets or purses, they head out into the world confident that whenever they need food, fuel or shopping satisfaction, such delights are merely a swipe or a tap away. It’s a significant challenge for marketers, to rearrange their data geolocationally to meet consumer needs — and to make sure that the information is available in formats that our digital intermediaries Google, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook and Amazon (and their voice-activated minions Alexa, Google Assistant & Home, M, Siri and Cortana) can understand.

Shopping Glocal
As the Internet caught on down under, Kiwi online shopping was quick to go global, especially for those products unavailable in New Zealand (or too expensive to source locally, for a variety of reasons). Even so, the perceived complexity of global shopping limited its adoption amongst the tech-timid.

Times have changed, particularly because leading US retailers have come to recognise the potential revenues to be gained from global audiences. Over the last few years, famous brands such as Macy’s and Neiman Marcus have been welcoming Kiwi visitors to their websites with the news that they are:

  • now shipping to New Zealand
  • displaying prices in Kiwi dollars
  • offering low international shipping rates
  • calculating duties and taxes at checkout
  • providing guaranteed landing costs

All in all, it’s an attractive mix — but it is now becoming even more so, as global retailers move into the neighbourhood. Already, many of the biggest sellers on Trade Me are now international operators. H&M, Top Shop, David Jones and Zara have begun colonisation of local shopping precincts. And Amazon is about to open distribution centres across the Tasman, reducing shipping costs even further.

“Glocal” (Global+Local) is a horrible neologism — and an even worse reality for Kiwi retailers. We examine the trend, its implications and possible solutions.

Other Shopping trends we review include:

  • Fashion for “Real bodies” — clothing tailored for real people, not just supermodels
  • Healthwear — clothing that monitors (and sometimes helps with) health conditions
  • Fashion’s fast lane — leading fashion designers are slashing the timelag between runway shows and getting products instore

What other topics do we cover in this NZ Consumer Trends presentation?

Try these:

  • Authenticity and its importance in a world of fake news, overblown hype and unsubstantiated promises
  • The expectations (and the perils) of Personalisation
  • Subscription Everything — curation meets recurring revenue
  • Fitness on display — “look at me” sportwear
  • Experiential Digital — what Pokemon Go taught us about blending real and virtual
  • Gone Incognito — hiding in plain sight, consumers rebel against the death of privacy
  • The Ethical Consumer — we won’t pay more but we expect brands to behave
  • Addiction in your pocket or purse — the smartphone breeds subservience
  • Always On, unlimited — the connected majority
  • Streaming Video changes us all — bingewatching, your programmes whenever and wherever
  • Adblocking goes mainstream — display ads are under threat as adblocking gets built into browser software
  • AI everywhere — Skynet takes over, one “OK Google” at a time
  • Voice input ascendant — voice recognition software is now faster and more efficient than keyboard entry
  • Biometric ID — your face, your eye or your fingerprint is now your password (and much easier to remember)
  • The Sharing Economy — cars, bikes, accommodation: what else can we share?
  • P2P Financing — why should the banks make all the money?
  • Maori Cuisine — coming to a restaurant near you
  • Back to Traditional Products & Tastes — a return to authentic values
  • V Power — plant-focused formulations wow the mainstream
  • Night Foods — food ingredients designed to help us sleep

All that and plenty more (many of which we’re keeping under our hats for now), in the NZ Consumer Trends 2017 report and slide presentation, to be published in May 2017. To order this presentation, see the available packages below.

 

2 Influencer Marketing 2017 (to be published June 2017)

influencer-marketing-nz-2017

Our second special report/presentation of the year deals with the fast-growing topic of Influencer Marketing.

If you’re not sure exactly what Influencer Marketing is, allow TapInfluence to explain:

Influencer marketing is a type of marketing that focuses on using key leaders to drive your brand’s message to the larger market. Rather than marketing directly to a large group of consumers, you instead inspire / hire / pay Influencers to get out the word for you.

Influencer Marketing has evolved from humble origins to end up as the preferred buzzword to describe the current iteration of a well-established and familiar marketing tool: using “celebrities” to promote your products.

There’s a bit more to Influencer Marketing than just plunking a few celebrities into a TV commercial, however. Today’s definition of “celebrities” (Influencers) has broadened to encompass those who are, in the words of Andy Warhol, “famous for 15 minutes”.

At the same time, the number of celebrity followers that an Influencer might attract has shrunk from hundreds of thousands to, sometimes mere hundreds (whose celebrity leaders have been accordingly dubbed micro-influencers).

The Internet in general, and social media in particular, has brought us thousands of influencers and micro-influencers, whose hustling on behalf of a product can encourage many of their followers to actually purchase said product.

Why? Because, according to a report by Nielsen, 92% of people trust recommendations from individuals over brands. And, let’s face it, many brands have brought that fate upon themselves by their own less-than-trustworthy behaviour.

Anyway, here’s how Google Trends depicts Influencer Marketing’s growth in search popularity over the last few years:

im-trends

How hot is Influencer Marketing, really?

Here’s one indicator: 84% of US marketers are planning to use Influencer Marketing this year (according to Acorn Influence).

So, to bring you up to speed with Influencer Marketing, we’re producing this special presentation, whose topics include:

The Seven Most Effective Influencer Marketing Strategies
As it turns out, there’s a bit more to Influencer Marketing than simply tracking down people who seem to have a lot of followers in social media. We share proven strategies which will help lessen potential heartache.

How to Choose the Influencers Who are Right for You
Not all Influencers are created equal (and there are more than a few pretenders to the throne out there). We discuss what to look for (and what to avoid) — and why you should proceed slowly as you assemble your Influencer team.

Best Practices on Connecting with Influencers
Once you’ve determined the most appropriate Influencers for your brand, it’s time to reach out and connect. If you’re not careful though, and haven’t thought through the right approach, you might be turned down — or end up paying too much. We share lessons from others that will help ease the way.

Where and How to Find Kiwi Influencers
There are surprising numbers of influential New Zealanders who have attracted a wide following through their efforts on YouTube, Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and elsewhere. We show you how to find them — and also sound a few cautionary notes.

In the Influencer Marketing NZ Presentation, we also examine:

  • the top Power Words to use
  • creative ways to incentivize influencers
  • Influencer Marketing measurement, KPIs & ROI
  • the four Rs of effective Influencer Marketing
  • how to run successful Influencer Marketing campaigns
  • what Google’s purchase of Famebit tells us about the future of Influencer Marketing
  • why major players are now buying Influencers
  • Influencer Case Studies
  • Influencer Marketing Tools
  • why Influencer campaigns fail
  • the fastest way to destroy your Influencer Marketing efforts
  • twenty trends that will shape Influencer Marketing in the next year

All that and of course much more, in the Influencer Marketing NZ 2017 report and slide presentation, coming out in June. Again, to order this presentation, see the available packages below.

 

3 Online Video Marketing 2017 (to be published July 2017)

online-video-nz-2017

Online Video is no longer an “up-and-coming” marketing tactic — it’s here, and it’s a powerful way to communicate your brand story, explain your value proposition, and build relationships with your customers and prospects.

And the statistics show that it’s working its socks off, especially with younger audiences:

video-by-device

The 2016 Nielsen New Zealand Multi-Screen Report, covering trends of Kiwi video viewing, reveals that around a quarter (26%) of New Zealanders watch TV content through other devices (not a TV set) in an average week. Besides the TV set, the most popular devices for watching video content across a week are desktops/laptops (39%), smartphones (27%) and tablets (18%).

We offer a training course covering Online Video Marketing, but the topic has become so important that we’re also creating this special report/presentation to bring you up to speed with the latest developments in Online Video.

In the presentation, we cover:

Google Loves Video
It’s not always evident down our way, but Google gives priority in search results to those that include videos. Which spells opportunity: add videos to your pages, optimised for relevant keywords, and feel the Google love.

Customers Now Expect Moving Pictures
When you realize that 25% of consumers will lose interest in your brand if you don’t have a video explaining your product or service, you’ll quickly decide the videos are really important for your brand as well.

The Transformative Nature of Live Video
Facebook and YouTube have gone all-in on live video, giving live content pride of place on their respective networks. If you can create relevant, entertaining live video for your brand, this just could be the most effective weapon in your marketing arsenal.

One Size No Longer Fits All
Gone are the days when you could make one video on Youtube and share it all over social media. Nowadays, it’s vital to create content that’s relevant to each platform.

Vertical Videos Are A Thing
The near-universal adoption of smartphones, as both capture and viewing mechanism, means that Vertical Video is now a valid — and desirable — format. But you do need to develop content that’s optimised for that format.

More Videos Will Be Designed to Play Without Sound
According to Digiday, 85 percent of Facebook video is watched without sound. Suddenly, that stark statistic underlines the necessity of providing effective captions for your videos. In this section we reveal a surprisingly easy way to create captions for Facebook.

Other topics featured in this presentation include:

  • the steady growth of VR and 360 degree videos
  • how brands have already started integrating videos into their website design
  • the unexpected value of video voicemail
  • skyrocketing Video Advertising budgets
  • the accelerated growth of Video Retargeting
  • Increase in A/B Video Testing
  • Crisis Management and Video
  • the viral ingredients of successful videos

All that and the latest breaking news and trends, in the Online Video Marketing NZ 2017 report and slide presentation, coming out in July. Again, to order see the available packages below.

 

4 Messaging Apps 2017 (to be published August 2017)

messaging-nz-2017

According to Evan Wray, Co-Founder and VP of Swyft Media:

Messaging today is very similar to where traditional social media was in 2007/08. Brands know that there are hundreds of millions/billions of highly engaged users, but these same brands are also still trying to figure out exactly how to engage these users effectively. This is a massive opportunity for first movers in the messaging space, just like there was in 2007/08 for those brands that took advantage of social.”

Well, we’ve been there done that in the social media space, so we know an opportunity when we see it — and we’re more than happy to share it with you through this Messaging NZ 2017 presentation.

The presentation covers:

Users Getting Older
In the early days of messaging, early adopters were largely drawn from younger generations. Now, as they usually do, the grown-ups are getting into the act. By mid-2016, 29% of those aged 30-49 used messaging apps compared with 42% of 18-29s (US data).

Chatbots becoming useful
Chatbots have been around a whole lot longer than you think (since 1994, according to Wikipedia, when they were first described as chatterbots). But they’ve only really gone mainstream in the last couple of years, thanks to messaging apps in general — and Facebook Messenger particular. At the Facebook f8 developer conference in April 2017, Facebook announced that Messenger has grown to support 100,000 developers who have made 100,000 bots. Most don’t do much — but the technology has now moved from novelty to utility, especially in terms of enhanced customer service and truly personalised results thanks to machine learning.

The Top 5 Chatbot Capabilities
According to a study by the US interactive advertising bureau, these are the top five capabilities that chatbots make possible:

  • personal connection
  • discovery
  • curation
  • utility
  • online to off-line connection

What Else Might Messaging Apps Do?
To peek into the future of messaging apps, turn our attention to China’s own WeChat.
WeChat provides what several different apps would normally provide – text messaging, voice messaging, group messaging, video conferencing, video games, content sharing, location sharing, payment options and more. You can perform almost any task within the WeChat app – buy a mortgage, trade a stock and even grocery shop. Most recently, WeChat announced that users will be able to pay for Starbucks via the app’s payments.

Brands Will Embrace A2P (application-to-person) Messaging
Received a text message with an appointment reminder or an authentication code whilst banking online? That’s A2P, and is a great opportunity for brands to enhance their offerings and communicate more effectively, one-to-one, with customers.

Minimum Effort
Many of the development opportunities within messaging and machine learning are embodied in the notion of “minimum effort”. In a nutshell, when communicating with a company, consumers want their interactions to be made easier because the company already “knows” certain things about them (such as their clothing and shoes sizes, for example, or their preferred pizza flavours). Such knowledge is not typically available to front desk staff in the real world — but should be available in the virtual world once the customer identifies himself or herself.

Effective Enterprise Messaging
The majority of workers today prefer and expect to communicate with colleagues and receive company-related content on their mobiles.

Other topics that this presentation will cover include:

  • Chat-based commerce and payments
  • Security issues and opportunities
  • and the latest developments in messaging trends when the presentation is released

This presentation is due to be published in August 2017. Scroll down for ordering details.

 

5 Content Marketing 2018 (to be published September 2017)

content-marketing-nz-2018

Content Marketing continues to blossom, especially in New Zealand, as more and more brands realise that consumers are doing their own homework online rather than seeking advice from salespeople (who may — how can we put this delicately? — not be entirely objective).

One of the solutions: provide helpful, relevant content online so that when consumers do their homework, you’re able to shape their thinking accordingly.

That’s why Content Marketing has earned its place as one of the topics we cover in this year’s Marketing Insights Presentation Series.

Here are some of the issues we feature:

The power of Nearby and Micro-Moment Marketing
The ubiquitous smart phone continue to change the game. Where once longform content was king, now snackable snippets — served up in answer to queries like “restaurant near me” — have become the new currency. We explore the trend and its implications.

Content Marketing as Defensive Mechanism
So many people are talking — not always positively — about brands and companies online, and organisations don’t always get the chance to present their own point of view as part of that conversation. As a result, many are turning to Content Marketing as a means to get their message out there.

Talking to Your Own
Content marketing has also seen itself become an internal PR tool, used to communicate in a planned and more effective manner with staff, dealers and suppliers. How are you ensuring that your own people know what they should about your organisation?

Overcoming “Content Shock”
Even when marketers do invest in Content Marketing, there are challenges. One of the biggest challenge: getting heard out there, amongst the ever-increasing cacophony of social media posts, blogs, video and all. It’s been dubbed “Content Shock” — and we look at how to deal with it.

Content Will Get useful or Get Ignored
Smart marketers will begin to invest in bigger content projects such as creating free and robust online tools, writing the go-to books in their industries, and creating environments where their customers can build a community to share knowledge

Accountability
content marketers will be held accountable not just for how much content they create, but what it does for the business (much like demand generation teams).

Other topics that will feature in this presentation include:

  • Personalisation
  • Engagement
  • Data-driven Insights
  • Interactive Experiences
  • Face-to-face Opportunities & Live Events
  • challenges of developing engaging visual content
  • the talent shortage
  • Algorithm-driven content distribution
  • Live video
  • compelling content experiences
  • the emergence of AI journalism
  • Immersive Content Formats
  • Science-based content marketing
  • The rise of the Content Librarian
  • The continuing rise of paid promotion and the decline of organic reach

Scroll down to order.

 

6 Search Marketing 2018 (to be published October 2017)

search-marketing-nz-2018

Last but by no means least of the current series: an examination of Search Marketing Trends as we head towards 2018.

In this presentation, we’ll wax lyrical about a wide ranging collection of topics, including:

Mobile Really Must Be First
In May 2015, Google reported that mobile searches had surpassed desktop searches on its search engine. Since then, the company has taken many steps which signal that mobile, not desktop, should be considered as the default user experience. Google is moving towards giving priority to mobile-centric indexing, which means that your website must as well.

Three Seconds is the New Fast
According to a study Google presented in late 2016, website that gain priority in search results will be expected to load in three seconds or less. That’s simply a recognition by Google of the impatience of mobile-wielding web surfers. As you might imagine, that has direct implications for your website structure — and whether or not you opt for accelerated mobile pages (AMP) or Progressive Web Apps (PWA), which allow a website to work as if it were an app.

How Machine Learning is Revolutionising Google Search
Google CEO Sundar Pichai laid out the corporate mindset: “Machine learning is a core, transformative way by which we’re rethinking how we’re doing everything. We are thoughtfully applying it across all our products, be it search, ads, YouTube, or Play. And we’re in early days, but you will see us — in a systematic way — apply machine learning in all these areas.”

Perils of the Google Answer Box
In 2017/18, brands will need to place value on optimizing their digital content based on intent rather than specific keywords. As you have no doubt noticed, Google has become more and more likely to offer up specific answers rather than simply links to search results.

For example, here’s Google’s answer to the query “what is the height of mt egmont”:

google-height

So how do you get chosen to be the answer to such a query? We explore the options.

Google Shopping Now in NZ
Google Shopping has arrived in New Zealand and is likely to play a larger and larger role in commerce-based search queries. We look at the players so far and examine the possibilities.

Big Data + Search = Attribution Challenges
Today’s conversion paths are extremely complex and as a result, micro-moments matter more than ever. Engaging with customers’ days, weeks, and even months before they’re ready to convert is going to be the new norm.

Reconsider Bing
Bing is a big player amongst the new breed of digital assistants. It’s fueling the search of Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa, apart from being the default search engine of Microsoft’s Cortana. Ignore it at your peril.

The Move to Natural Language Queries
Why does Google have this irresistible interest in natural language? Sure, on an ideal level, it’s because Google wants “to provide the better answer to users’ needs,” and to do that, Google must:

  • Understand what each web document is about (semantics);
  • Understand what users are actually searching for, now that more and more using their voice to search

Voice Search
Already 20% of mobile queries are Voice Search (and will be 50% in 2020, according to Microsoft). Voice Search is going above and beyond voice recognition and evolving into voice understanding. This involves several changes with respect to:

  • previous searches
  • location-based context
  • context based on frequently used apps
  • personalised information
  • keyword research based on spoken queries

How should marketers modify their content to cope with those new search parameters?

The Search Marketing presentation also looks at:

  • the big challenges of cross-channel marketing
  • getting to know Google RankBrain
  • image recognition searches
  • Key SEO Stats
  • Google’s top 3 ranking signals
  • User Experience Optimisation
  • Content Marketing That Impacts SEO
  • and, of course, a whole lot more

 

Available Packages

As usual when we create new products, we like to offer you special introductory pricing if you purchase during the launch period. So, until Wednesday May 3*, take advantage of these incredible deals:

*We did originally have an earlier date, but what with Anzac Day and School Holidays and everything, we’ve extended the offer another few days

Any single presentation $597+GST ($477+GST if purchased by Wednesday May 3, saving you $120). Click here to sign up for the single presentation option via PayPal.

Any two presentations $1097+GST ($947+GST if purchased by Wednesday May 3, saving you $247 on the individual purchase price). Click here to sign up for the two presentation option via PayPal.

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Five presentations $1997+GST ($1847+GST if purchased by Wednesday May 3, saving you $1138 on the individual purchase price). Click here to sign up for the five presentation option via PayPal.

All six presentations $2197+GST ($1997+GST if purchased by Wednesday May 3, saving you $1585 on the individual purchase price). Click here to sign up for the all 6 presentations option via PayPal.

Alternatively, sign up for a six-month subscription package for all six presentations and pay $397+GST [$456.55 including GST] per month, saving you $1200 on the individual purchase price. Click here to sign up for the subscription option via PayPal. Your credit card will be billed monthly on the anniversary of your subscription.

BILLING OPTIONS

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WHAT HAPPENS NEXT

1. Your purchase will be confirmed by email (if you have not received a confirmation within 24 hours, feel free to email [email protected]).
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3. As each presentation is published, download instructions will be provided to you by email.

Hurry! Take advantage of these special introductory offers, available if you book by Wednesday May 3.

Writing for the Web – new online training course

writing-for-the-web-online-training-course

It has been apparent for some time that effective writing has become an absolutely core competency when communicating online. We’ve moved away from the pseudo-words beloved of text messaging and are now at a stage where true wordcraft is vital to communication.

Not just any writing, however. Different media require different approaches. The headline that might have looked wonderful in the newspaper probably won’t fit within the constraints of Facebook or Instagram character counts.

And the few seconds that represent the average time-on-site for typical web browsers means that we simply don’t have the luxury of indulging in long paragraphs.

Yes, writing for the web requires a whole different approach — and you can either learn that the hard way, by discovering it for yourself, or learn from us.

A couple of years ago, in response to this need, we developed a popular half day workshop to take marketers through the requirements of writing for the web.

Now, in response to demand from New Zealand businesses, we have repurposed that workshop as a full-blown online training course, complete with content that’s been refreshed and updated to reflect today’s needs.

Writing for the Web – online training course

Here’s what the course covers:

Introduction

Why writing for the web requires different approaches to writing for traditional media (and how this course takes you through the key elements you need to know).

Lesson One: Understanding the Essentials

1. WHO
Who are You Writing To? Before you create a single sentence, you need to understand your target consumers — otherwise your words may be wasted.

In this part of Lesson One, we cover:

  • Profiling your ideal customers
  • Determining their motivations and attitudes
  • Reviewing their media habits
  • Understanding their preferred communications formats
  • Determining their needs & wants
  • Identifying their concerns, goals & challenges
  • Shaping your solutions accordingly

2. WHAT
What are you writing about? Take a closer look at your self and your organisation, so that your communications reflect exactly who you are. We review:

  • Understanding your brand personality
  • Staying true to your brand values
  • The importance of authenticity and credibility

3. WHERE
Where should you promote your products and services? Not all digital media are alike. For every Trade Me that has more than 700,000 visitors a day, there are a million websites that have 1 visitor or less. Don’t waste your time putting your content where no-one will see it. Instead, take a look at this section of the course, where we discuss:

  • Selecting the most appropriate digital media vehicles
  • Reviewing the performance of your own digital assets
  • Evaluating traditional media website offerings
  • Determining the most appropriate social media options

4. WHEN
When are consumers most likely to be exposed to your messages? With consumers bombarded by messages all day every day, you need to know exactly when your followers are online and most likely to see what you’ve written.

In this section, we show you:

  • What you should know about your email open rates, by day and by time
  • How to identify when your Facebook followers are online
  • How to determine the most appropriate times to use messaging apps

5. HOW
What format(s) should you use for your messages? Not every format is equally popular. We explore which formats are right for your followers, and identify:

  • Average shares by content type
  • The most popular content formats
  • the importance of pictures
  • The runaway popularity of video

 

Lesson Two: The Content Formula

What should you talk about online? Too many organisations are too busy talking about themselves to even notice that their followers just aren’t bothering with them anymore.

In Lesson Two, we share:

  • The content sweet spot
  • The seven attributes of effective content
  • Google’s Zero Moment of Truth formula and why it matters to marketers
  • The new importance of listening
  • Seven consumer comment types and what they mean

Lesson Three: Keywords

How can you make your writing insanely popular? The answer, as you’ve probably guessed from the title of this lesson, is Keywords.

But not just any keywords. There’s an Art and a Science to effective keyword usage, and in Lesson Three, we’re going to tell you:

  • What you need to know about keyword search patterns
  • The importance of longtail keywords
  • The hotlist of buyer keywords
  • The essential knowledge that you can learn from the Google Keywords Planner

 

Lesson Four: SEO

How can you shape your content so that Google will notice that you exist — and will give you priority over your competitors?

Lesson Four tackles Search Engine Optimisation — more popularly known as SEO — from a writer’s perspective, and tells you:

  • How to analyse your competitors’ keywords
  • Best practices for optimising your content for search engines
  • Headline length, keyword density, using alternative wording and other key strategies to get noticed by Google

 

Lesson Five: Seducing Your Digital Visitors

How can you best lure visitors to your content? In this Lesson, we discuss the gentle practice of luring interested prospects to you, which involves:

  • Crafting an effective description
  • Teasing your story
  • Capturing the essence of your offering
  • Placing keyword phrases as effectively as possible
  • Avoiding duplication
  • Developing unique descriptions
  • Using SEO plug-ins

 

Lesson Six: Sharing

How can you get people to share your content?

In this lesson we explore the types of content that people love — and love to share. You’ll learn about:

  • Why people share
  • The 20 types of sharing styles that are most effective in social media
  • Finding and using hash tags effectively
  • How you can help your content travel

 

Lesson Seven: Content Structure

How can you best plan out your content so that you don’t end up staring at a blank page and wondering what to write about?

In Lesson Seven, we cover:

  • How to create an effective content calendar
  • Optimal sizes and word lengths, by medium
  • Most popular lengths for blog & social media posts
  • What you need to know about email subject lines

 

Lesson Eight: Online Advertising

What should you know about online advertising now that it’s become New Zealand’s most popular advertising medium?

All these and more:

  • How to create an effective AdWords advertisement
  • The secrets of dynamic ads
  • What you need to know about Facebook advertising
  • All about Pinterest Promoted Pins
  • Video advertising explored and explained

 

Lesson Nine: Content Curation

Much of your online activity can, and often should, involve sharing other people’s content. So how do you find and share that content?

In Lesson Nine, we reveal:

  • Curation tools you can use
  • Where to find trending topics
  • How best to share

 

Epilogue

We close with a warning, as we reveal the seven deadly sins of writing for the web.

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WHO WILL BENEFIT FROM THIS COURSE?
Every organisation and every person who needs to prepare online content, whether for your website, for your blog, for social media or for video.

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WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING ABOUT OUR COURSES

Here’s a sampling of the feedback we’ve received from those who’ve taken our courses:

  • Thanks for an informative and interesting [Facebook Accelerator] course. Your presentation held a good balance of theoretical and practical information and was clear and simple enough for a non IT Facebook novice like me to follow. There are many ideas that I have gained that I will attempt to incorporate in the overall marketing plan my team is currently developing for our brand. Facebook can offer so much more than I thought as a medium for communicating with our current and prospective customers. Julie D
  • I found this course fantastic, i started off knowing very little about facebook (just how to run my own personal page) to now having a thorough understanding of ALL the things you can (and there is a lot). The course format was great and allowed knowledge to be built up over time. Course length was great and this will definetly be something i come back to constantly as we develop our facebook pages more within my company. Aleisha H
  • I have really enjoyed the course and the way it was structured. It was informative and interesting – liked the way you incorporated slide-shows, video, statistics and different forms of media to provide information. Lisa C

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TIMING

This course begins on Wednesday 10 May, 2017.

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INVESTMENT

This nine-part online training course is available for $597 +GST. However we offer an EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT of $100 +GST — pay just $497+GST for bookings received by the end of Wednesday 03 May, 2017.

Bookings are confirmed on receipt of payment, which can be by bank deposit or credit card. We can raise an invoice in advance if you need it.

To reserve your place in this course, please pay by credit card through PayPal by clicking here.

Register Now for the next course

If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

You’ll receive our emailed confirmation of your booking. Then on the first day of the course we’ll follow up with details of your Login and Password, along with an Enrolment Key for the Writing for the Web online training course.

 

Hottest Facebook Categories: NZ April 2017

hottest-nz-facebook-categories

As we do from time to time, we’ve taken a deep dive into our database of 24,836 New Zealand Facebook pages to see what we can learn.

This time, we’ve sliced and diced by category to determine which are the most popular Kiwi categories on Facebook.

CAVEAT

There are a couple of cautions we wish to issue before we get into the details, however, just so you know why some of your favourite categories aren’t represented in these top 20 lists.

Firstly, you should know that before we started any number-crunching we removed most of the top 50 “most liked” NZ Facebook pages. That’s because those pages, typically NZ variants of international brands such as McDonald’s, KFC, Walt Disney, Nivea, Nissan, Cadbury and even Facebook itself, are displaying cumulative global likes rather than merely local numbers. As a result, total likes are somewhat out of alignment with local performances. It’s great that Facebook has 186 million likes, but such numbers tend to skew the averages.

For example, if we leave the global data in place, the average New Zealand Facebook page is rated as having 39,037 followers — a number that’s only surpassed by the top 500 or so Kiwi Facebook pages (out of our nearly 25,000 total).

Once we’ve stripped out most of the global pages, however, we arrive at a far more realistic and attainable average of 5,075 likes.

In the last seven days, just 146 people were talking about the average NZ Facebook page, an engagement percentage of 2.88%.

CAUTION: STATISTICAL ANOMALIES MAY LIE AHEAD

Secondly, we did want to point out the statistical dangers involved once we drill down into individual categories.

For this report, we have separated our database into the 700 different categories that Facebook offers (all of which are self-selected choices when a business creates a page).

As a result, more than a third of the available categories feature only one or two businesses — which, as you would imagine, means that the success or failure of the category depends on the performance of individual Facebook pages.

So, for example, if we look at the category “automotive storage facility“, that category tops the list of best performing Facebook pages in terms of engagement.

That category, however, represents a single business: Storage King Riccarton, which had a blinder of a pre-Easter promotion (requiring likes and comments to win a box of Easter treats).

storage-king

So, with those warnings in place, let’s take a look at some numbers.

1 Facebook Likes

Firstly, let’s look at the categories that have attracted the most overall likes:

NZ FACEBOOK PAGES BY CATEGORY: AVERAGE LIKES APRIL 2017

fb-categories-april-2017-most-liked

The top category, “Society/Culture Website”, is again skewed by a single page, for Oh! Baby — but, in this case, the page’s performance is steady across multiple posts and reflects effective use of Facebook. Take a look at the Oh! Baby page and see what you can learn for yourself.

2 Facebook Talks

Our second view of our category averages is by talks — the average number of people talking about pages in the category over the last seven days.

Results are very similar to likes:

NZ FACEBOOK PAGES BY CATEGORY: AVERAGE TALKS APRIL 2017

fb-categories-april-2017-most-talks

3 Facebook Engagement

Finally, if we examine the Facebook page categories by Engagement (which we define as the number of talks compared to the total number of likes, expressed as a percentage), we see quite a different picture:

NZ FACEBOOK PAGES BY CATEGORY: MOST ENGAGEMENT APRIL 2017

fb-categories-april-2017-most-engagement

Again, as we noted above, the results will be skewed by individual page performances (and we don’t have time to dig much deeper right now). Still, the results give us an interesting perspective when we consider that:

  • dry cleaners are more interesting than government organizations
  • car dealers get a better rap than the public service
  • dog walkers are more popular than psychics (who should have seen that coming

(Of course, if you’d like to know more about Facebook, and how to perform as well as some of these marketers, check out our courses):

Facebook Accelerator Programme
fba-banner

So you have a few hundred (or a few thousand) followers on Facebook but now you want to know how to get to the next level? Our Facebook Accelerator seven-part online course will lead you through the steps necessary to supercharge your Facebook presence and get Kiwi consumers engaging with you and your brands.

For more details of the Facebook Accelerator programme, please click here.

The Complete Facebook Marketing Course
completefb-banner

For those who wish to master Facebook Marketing in its entirety, we’ve created a ten-week online training programme which will take you from absolute beginner on Facebook to highly effective Facebook communicator.

For more details of the Complete Facebook Marketing programme, please click here.

If you want to improve your performance beyond Facebook, check out our Social Media Marketing Essentials course:

Social Media Marketing Essentials

Social Media Marketing Essentials

Social media is an ever-changing environment and unless you’re involved on a day to day basis you’re unlikely to stay up-to-date with the latest developments in the medium. So we’ve devised this social media marketing essentials course to capture the latest developments across the expanding world of social media for 2017.

For more details of the Social Media Essentials course, please click here.

The Continuing Devolution of LinkedIn

devolution-of-linkedin

We’ve seen it happen with Facebook, so we really shouldn’t be too surprised as LinkedIn continues to move in the same direction: the steady erosion of once-free services, all aimed at improving the social network’s bottom line.

B2B marketers have been spoiled for many years by the free availability of information on LinkedIn that allows the more astute among us to research prospects and competitors and to promote ourselves and our organisations using the professional social network.

Over time, however, we’ve seen a number of free services fall by the wayside as LinkedIn has refocused itself to concentrate on those products and services that actually make money for the company.

We can’t actually blame them — it’s their sandbox, after all — but it can be intensely frustrating, especially when core capabilities, those that organisations have relied upon heavily, are arbitrarily removed or placed beyond paywalls.

Take, for example,Tags, once a simple way to filter and organise your connections on LinkedIn (e.g. tagging customers, prospects and suppliers so that you could sort them easily).

Earlier this year, LinkedIn announced that “we’re removing the Relationship Section of your profile, which allowed you to add Reminders, Notes and Tags to your connections. If you want to download your existing Notes and Tags, you’ll have the option to do so through May 31, 2017.”

Brutal, for those who relied on the tagging system to make sense of their hundreds or thousands of connections.

There is a (paid) alternative: “if you are looking for similar functionalities, consider our Sales Navigator or Recruiter Lite products that allow you to transfer and view your existing notes and tags”.

But Wait, There’s Less

Late February/early March 2017 saw even more change, with the release (for most) of a whole new look for LinkedIn. We’ll let Fatima Williams describe what she calls “The Day of Disaster“:

Yes, I got switched to the new interface and it won’t let me do anything. You hide everything . I can’t see images they are so tiny, my eyes are fine.

The stickers to make work a little fun while sending messages is removed. I can’t see candidates who are outside my network. I know I can’t connect with them but if I don’t see them how am I to even connect with them???

The hope’s of one finding a job by anybody is now gone. Don’t tell me try premium — been there, done that No Thank you!

Should I start an online petition to get them to get us back to the old interface so I can help those candidates out of my reach!

” The new interface is of no use to poor unemployed job seekers who have no hope and cannot afford the premium membership. Forget the premium members who are now asked to pay for features they lost. Your customers/users (job-seekers) are the source of your revenue – Fatima Williams

A few other comments from some of the 1356 mostly-disgruntled LinkedIn users who responded to the post:

  • Less functional and certainly not user friendly! please back to previous one – Didier Bassleer
  • Innovation shall not mean regression. We are humans and have our habits of humans. Previous visual was friendly enough to find our way easily and get what we were needing quickly.-Patrick LR Le Guirriec
  • The new one is only cosmetic, less organized and less functional. – Marco Koelink
  • The removal of the ability to view one’s news feed in reverse chronological order (i.e., ‘recent first’) was a devastating loss. Extremely useful for tracking one’s news from login to login; a user could “pick up where he/she left off”, but now it’s gone. Too bad – Jim Kracht
  • I’m OK with the new design. It’s the removal of functionality that bothers me. Just like FB, they now tell me what they think I want to see in my news feed Denny Russell
  • How about posting suggestions here for other platforms we can each explore, evaluate, and migrate over to if they seem better? I acknowledge the scope of my network on here is broad, and that any competing platforms are likely to need our support to power up to an equivalent reach. But holding onto the tail of a dying dinosaur is perilous. And with Microsoft’s inevitable strangling of service in pursuit of forced extraction of profits, they have signaled the slow death of this beast. So what else is out there for us to explore? – Erik Van Lennep
  • I agree this latest version is one of the worst they have put out over the past 8 yearsShane Null
  • Is anybody at LinkedIn listening to the Voice Of the Customers? So much efforts fostering the sharing of professional content and so little walking the talking… – Sergio Berna
  • YES. The new LinkedIn stinks! I used to log on and get notifications telling me when someone had replied to my posts. Now I no longer do. Nor is there any other way to easily find my way back to the conversations I’ve been involved in in the forums. So I hardly bother logging on at all anymore. – Andrew Horn
  • Leave it to Microsoft to take away the networking component of a networking site. – Ronald Regnier

Heartfelt angst, right there (although many LinkedIn members won’t actually know what Fatima and the other correspondents are talking about, because they simply don’t use LinkedIn that much).

So what can be done?

Well, LinkedIn is simply going to continue to change (especially as new owners Microsoft start to implement their own plans).

You can either (A) turn your back on LinkedIn (except as a CV-replicating tool); or (B) learn how to master the new, “improved” LinkedIn.

If Plan B sounds like you, we can help, with a couple of options:

1 IN-PERSON WORKSHOPS

For larger organisations, we’ve developed a couple of hands-on Workshops for you and your teams:

  • LinkedIn Masterclass, half-day sessions designed to help participants re-work and develop their LinkedIn presence to really sell themselves and their organisation
  • Using LinkedIn as a Sales Tool, a two-hour workshop specifically designed to help B2B sales-people use LinkedIn to sell their goods and services

If you’re interested in in-person Workshops, email us at michael (AT) netmarketingservices.co.nz or phone 021 1492 403.

 

2 ONLINE TRAINING COURSE

Alternatively, you should certainly consider our online training course “How to use LinkedIn Effectively, updated to reflect the latest changes:

linkedin-banner

LinkedIn operates the world’s largest professional network on the Internet with (as of January 2017) more than 467 million members in over 200 countries and territories.

New Zealand now boasts more than 1,540,000 LinkedIn members, according to the latest LinkedIn data. Yet far too many of those members simply don’t know how to use LinkedIn effectively to promote themselves or their organisations.

In response to this need, we’ve developed a course that will show you how to use LinkedIn to best advantage, taking account of the developments being rolled out regularly by the LinkedIn team.

About the Course

This is a seven-part online training course providing a comprehensive introduction to LinkedIn, from the Basics to detailed instructions on how to use LinkedIn to promote your organisation, build your personal reputation and even make sales.

This online training course is conducted on a web-based e-learning software platform, enabling course participants to proceed at their own pace, accessing materials online. This particular online training course provides content in a variety of multimedia forms, including videos, slideshows, flash-based presentations and PDF files. No special software is required to participate.

Course lessons will be provided in seven parts, for participants to access in accordance with their own timetables. Interaction with the course tutor is enabled through the platform software tools (with telephone backup if required).

Feedback from those who have previously taken one of our courses:

  • “this was the best professional development course I have done in many years” – Mark R, senior Agency Exec responsible for social media
  • “thought the information within was outstanding” – Ed P, General Manager
  • “What I loved was that I started with a fairly rudimentary understanding of social media but have learned a lot – including where to find more information as I need it.” – Fiona W, Marketing Manager
  • “I found it relevant, informative, topical, insightful and a bloody good read. It’s never evangelical, too techy, patronising, assumes that you know too much or too little about digital and has a warm sense of humour in the communication throughout which helped faciliate the learning process for me.” — Adrienne B, new media senior executive
  • “Am thoroughly enjoying the content!” – Kara B, magazine co-ordinator
  • “I completed the first lesson today and found it really interesting and love the interaction already! I am so looking forward to the second lesson already …” — Annette B, public relations director

COURSE CREATION AND TUTORING
This “How to use LinkedIn Effectively” programme has been created and is tutored by Michael Carney. Michael has been in the marketing game since 1971, online since 1987 and keeps tabs on a wide range of trends and developments, locally and around the world. He is the author of “Trade Me Success Secrets” (now in its Second Edition) and a regular magazine columnist. Michael is also the creator of a number of online training courses, covering social media, eCommerce and other aspects of digital marketing.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE “HOW TO USE LINKEDIN EFFECTIVELY” COURSE

Any business professional who wants to master LinkedIn, whether to further their own career or to develop their business presence on the world’s leading Social B2B network.

COURSE CONTENTS

Lesson One: How To Set Yourself Up Effectively On LinkedIn

You’re probably one of the hundreds of millions who already have a profile on LinkedIn — but is it just a transplanted CV? We show you how to turn your basic profile into a living, selling document that:

  • showcases your unique talents and experience to best advantage
  • reinforces your personal brand with a compelling headline that’s the first thing any visitor will see
  • highlights your achievements, not just your history
  • provides a platform for your future success

Lesson One also covers:

  • The most effective ways to ask for recommendations and endorsements
  • How to use the principle of Reciprocity to sharpen your profile
  • Trojan Horse Marketing and how it can really work for you
  • How to claim your name on LinkedIn (and why it matters)
  • How to optimize your profile for SEO
  • How to use LinkedIn’s Mobile Apps and how you can ensure that your profile stands out on every platform
  • The power of an effective profile summary
  • How to re-shape your profile to make it sizzle (and show off your best bits)

Lesson Two: How To Use LinkedIn For Business

Once you have your own personal profile up and sizzling, it’s time to turn your attention to your organisation (especially if you operate in the B2B space). LinkedIn has now surpassed Twitter as the most popular social medium for distributing B2B content, with 83% of B2B marketers using LinkedIn to promote their organisations. So where do you begin? We start with Company Pages (which were recently redesigned to make it easier for LinkedIn users to find, follow and engage with companies of interest).

Topics covered in Lesson Two include:

  • How to use LinkedIn Banner Images to showcase your company brand and really bring your page to life
  • How to attract keen followers to your company pages (and what that does for your organisation’s visibility on LinkedIn)
  • What you can now say about your company’s products and services
  • How to harness social proof to best effect
  • Why you must make your updates valuable, relevant and interesting (and what that really means)

Lesson Three: How To Use LinkedIn To Find A Job

You’ve probably heard that LinkedIn is very useful when you’re looking for a new job — but where do you start?

In Lesson Three, we talk about:

  • How to use LinkedIn to get the word out that you’re in the market
  • How to polish your LinkedIn profile even further, to highlight your best (and most employable) characteristics
  • How to find out where people with your skillset are working
  • How to check if a company is still hiring
  • How to identify new recruits (and perhaps pick their brains)
  • How to find out who’s who in your target industry
  • How to network shamelessly to future-proof your career
  • How to build your personal brand
  • How to enhance your Resume with LinkedIn Testimonials
  • How to find (and capitalise on) inside connections at potential employers
  • How to search the hidden job market for opportunities
  • How to use LinkedIn to prepare for your job interview

Lesson Four: How To Use LinkedIn To Generate Business

Can you actually use LinkedIn to create business? Yes, indeed you can, and we’ll show you how. Along the way, we’ll talk about:

  • How to use LinkedIn to find business opportunities
  • How to Use LinkedIn Groups to build relationships with prospects and attract new leads
  • How to decide who you should connect with (and who doesn’t make the cut)
  • The power of a clear Call To Action
  • LinkedIn Special Offers (and where it’s appropriate to make them)
  • How LinkedIn’s Advanced People Search feature can be your very best prospecting friend
  • How to use LinkedIn for sales success

Lesson Five: How To Use LinkedIn’s Paid Services

You’ve probably noticed that, whilst many of LinkedIn’s services are free, you are occasionally encouraged to buy some stuff there. Reportedly, around 2% of LinkedIn members have paid-for subscriptions. So should you dip into your pocket?

In Lesson Six, we evaluate the pros and cons of:

  • LinkedIn paid advertising — how it works, what you can expect to pay and what results to aim for
  • The surprising response rates of LinkedIn InMails (and when using them is worthwhile)
  • How to use LinkedIn’s Profile Organizer
  • The LinkedIn paid account options and what they provide

Lesson Six: How To Use LinkedIn To Promote Your Business

So far we’ve looked at how to use LinkedIn to make sales and build your reputation. But LinkedIn is also an ideal vehicle for promoting your organisation to other businesses.

In Lesson Six we’ll look at the promotional potential of LinkedIn, including:

  • How (and how often) to craft status updates that will appeal to your target customers and clients
  • Best practices for sending out mass messages and invitations (without being a pest)
  • How to use Groups to build your authority and keep in regular touch with your prospects
  • How to connect from LinkedIn to the rest of the web, using widgets and plugins and other automated services
  • How to share useful articles and resources without overdoing it
  • How to add videos and presentations to LinkedIn
  • How to use the right tools to manage your LinkedIn content to avoid getting overwhelmed

Lesson Seven: How To Use LinkedIn For Recruiting

We’ve already covered using LinkedIn to find a new job. In Lesson Seven we look at the flip side of the coin — how to use LinkedIn to find the most appropriate candidates for vacancies within your organisation.

In this lesson, we consider:

  • why LinkedIn is a fertile ground within which to find perhaps 80% of your prospective employees
  • How to use LinkedIn to tap into the most effective recruiting source of all
  • The crowd-sourced accuracy of LinkedIn profiles
  • LinkedIn’s job-posting facilities (and whether you should use them)
  • Soliciting introductions: the appropriate protocols
  • How to use LinkedIn to search and compare

TIMING

The next “How To Use LinkedIn Effectively” course begins on Monday 08 May, 2017.

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INVESTMENT

This seven-part online training course is available for $497 +GST. However we offer an Early Bird Discount of $100 — the course is just $397 +GST for bookings made and payment received by Monday 01 May, 2017.

Bookings are confirmed on receipt of payment, which can be by bank deposit or credit card. We can raise an invoice in advance if you need it.

To reserve your place in our “How To Use LinkedIn Effectively” course, please pay by credit card through PayPal by clicking here.

Register Now for the next course

If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to [email protected] with your requirements.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

You’ll receive our emailed confirmation of your booking. Then on the first day of the course we’ll follow up with details of your Login and Password, along with an Enrolment Key for the “How To Use LinkedIn Effectively” online training course.

If you have any questions, or would like more information, please email us at [email protected]

Outsourcing Your Social Media Marketing Activities Effectively

outsourcing your social media activities effectively

Now that Social Media has evolved from being “nice to have” to becoming an essential digital marketing tool, more and more businesses are outsourcing their social media.

However, to outsource your Social Media effectively — or even to brief others within your organisation — you need to be able to prepare an effective social media brief.

Most marketers are confident in their ability to prepare a brief for a poster or a billboard or a television commercial. But there’s a whole lot more required if you’re going to achieve success in Social Media.

So how do you prepare an effective social media brief?

The need for a comprehensive answer to that question has led us to evolve and expand our online training course covering the topic.

brief-banner

Here’s what the course covers:

Module One: Setting Social Objectives

What exactly do you and your organisation want to achieve through social media? We review possible answers to that question — taking into account not merely the obvious communications objectives that organisations typically set, but also those distinctly social attributes that most marketers overlook.

We show you how to review your own brand’s story and personality and how that will colour your social media efforts. We encourage you to re-examine your existing customers and prospects and determine what they might hope to hear from you through social media (and how frequently). And we take a look at social media objectives set by other organisations, for inspiration and guidance (and, in a few cases, as cautionary tales of what not to do in social media).

As a result of this module, you’ll be able to provide those who will be operating your social media programme with clear, agreed social objectives that (a) reflect your organisation, its heritage and the interests of its customers; and (b) take advantages of the rich possibilities inherent in social media.

Module Two: Agreeing Social Strategies & Tactics

Once your objectives are in place, it’s time to consider possible strategies to communicate through social media. Strategy in this context means figuring out what you want to be different after you’re done implementing your social media marketing — and that evaluation process should NOT be left to those carrying out the programme (because they’re seldom in a position to determine the relative priorities for an organisation).

Is the appropriate primary strategy based around reputation management, customer service or just getting people talking about your products? Or are you looking for specific leads or even sales (and how should you do that in social media without offending everyone)?

Once the strategic possibilities have been winnowed down to a chosen few, then it’s time to look at tactics to turn those strategies into reality. Most of the tactical decisions can be carried out at an operational level — but it’s still very much worth your while understanding the sorts of tactics that are relevant in the social space. That information may shape your views on decisions such as who is the most appropriate team to implement your social media programme as well as identifying the people within your organisation who should be points of contact for the programme (it won’t be just you).

Decisions on tactics will lead in turn to decisions on which social tools should be used: Twitter, Google Plus, Facebook, YouTube, Snapchat, Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube, Slideshare, the list goes on.

From Module Two, you’ll develop a solid base with which to have constructive discussions (and even perhaps robust debates) with your social media implementation team.

Module Three: Planning your Programme

What should you talk about in social media? One thing you shouldn’t be is merely reactive, responding to situations and comments as they happen.

Perhaps the most neglected part of the whole social media process is planning an effective, proactive social media communications schedule. Not only do you have to provide killer content that’s relevant and engages your constituents — you also need to plan out what you’re going to say in advance, tied in to topical events, matters of the moment and your own communications programme. That’s not something that can simply be left to that nephew of the CEO who’s running your Facebook page in his spare time.

In this module, we step you through the processes you’ll need to consider when developing an effective INTEGRATED social media schedule that’s linked into your other promotional efforts. We’ll also encourage you to talk to your implementation team about Content Optimisation — identifying your customers’ hottest topics and using the most popular keywords in their posts.

Module Four: Effective Facebook Posts

Facebook is New Zealand’s most popular social network by far, so it gets a module all to itself.

The biggest challenge for any business using Facebook pages these days? Creating Facebook posts that get noticed and get shared.

So this module tackles that problem head on, identifies the secrets of effective Facebook posts and shows you exactly what you need to do to stand out on Facebook.

We also discuss twenty different creative approaches that really work on Facebook (and show you how to determine which might be most relevant to your own organisation), so that you can brief your people accordingly.

Module Five: Images

Images continue to be a vital part of the Social Web. In Module Five, find out what you need to know about Instagram, Pinterest and other leading players, including:

  • How leading brands are winning with the image-based networks
  • how you can make the most of rich pins on Pinterest
  • how to use Instagram to its full potential
  • smart content strategies across the image-based networks

At the end of this module, you’ll know the visual content assets you need to use to take maximum advantage of image-based social media.

Module Six: Video

At the end of 2014 Facebook hosted approximately one billion video views per day. By the close of 2015, that figure had grown to over eight billion. While there’s still some debate about what qualifies as a video view (3 sec vs. 10 sec. vs. 30 secs?), the overall trajectory of Facebook video consumption is undeniable.

Video is central to Facebook’s vision for the future of the platform. In 2014 CEO Mark Zuckerberg was quoted as saying “In five years most of Facebook will be video”.

In this Module, we discuss exactly what you now need to know about video and social media, so that you can brief your suppliers accordingly.

Module Seven: Implementation

Finally, we turn to the processes required to make all this happen. We provide you with an appropriate framework for briefing your social media supplier, allocating internal and external resources and responsibilities and agreeing how the effort will be measured.

We also suggest a timetable for reviewing and adjusting your campaign, and how to evaluate the campaign effectively — do “likes”, “+1s” and “retweets” matter, how do you measure social engagement and what does it all mean?

OUTCOMES

By the end of this course:

  • you should be confident that you can effectively brief a supplier on your social media requirements
  • you should be able ensure that the results you are achieving don’t just “seem” good — they meet a concrete set of objectives consistent with your overall organisational goals

TIMING

The next seven-module programme begins on Tuesday 09 May, 2017.

PROGRAMME CREATOR
The “How to Prepare An Effective Social Media Brief” programme has been developed by Michael Carney

INVESTMENT

This programme is available for $497+GST.  However we offer an Early Bird Booking Discount of $100 — the course is just $397 +GST for bookings made and payment received by Tuesday 02 May, 2017.

To register and pay by credit card through PayPal, please click here

If you would prefer to pay by bank deposit, or require an invoice before making payment, please send an email to [email protected] with details of your request. (The service provider will be shown as Netmarketing Services Limited in your transaction and on your credit card statement).

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?
1. Your booking will be confirmed by email (if you have not received a confirmation within 24 hours, feel free to email [email protected]).
2. On the first day of the course you will be supplied by email with the first part of your How to Prepare An Effective Social Media Brief programme.
3. Follow-up lessons will be sent out over subsequent weeks (but please note that you take the course at your own pace).

NZ Politicians Finally Discover The Information Superhighway

interwebs

For decades, NZ electoral allocations — money provided by the Government to fund political advertising in the lead-up to general elections — have been legislatively restricted to paying for “broadcast” advertisements — defined in law as radio and television advertising (and the production thereof).

In a dramatic turnaround, a mere thirty years after the Internet arrived in New Zealand via CompuSerce, the politicians last week (March 15) saw fit to allow electoral funding to encompass Internet advertising as well.

As the Broadcasting (Election Programmes and Election Advertising) Amendment Bill (approved by 108 votes to 12 and now just awaiting Royal Assent to become law) notes, public monies may now be applied to fund radio and television and also:

all or part of the publishing costs incurred in relation to the publication of election advertisements on the Internet during the election period; and all or part of production costs, whenever incurred, in relation to election advertisements published on the Internet

Politicians (and their advertising agencies) should now brace themselves. Inevitably, they can expect to be inundated by approaches from any and every New Zealand digital medium, now that there’s a bucket of money just waiting to be spent.

(If that’s you, may we recommend you familiarise yourself with some of our online training courses, which will help you to understand the most effective ways to use digital media).

Opening & Closing Broadcasts Gone
The revised legislation also removes the compulsion on Television New Zealand and Radio New Zealand to screen opening and closing broadcasts.

Finally.

As Chris Hipkins (Labour—Rimutaka) noted during the debate about the legislation:

“When the rule around opening and closing broadcasts for election campaigns was introduced, there were two TV channels in New Zealand—only the two. If you were sitting at home watching TV and the opening and closing broadcasts were broadcast on both of those channels, as they were back in those days, you had no choice other than to watch them or turn off the TV. The reality now is that that is simply not the medium any more. People can be watching live-streamed content on Netflix, they can be using MY SKY or any other type of device, they could be watching all sorts of other things, or they could be accessing content via social media.

“The idea that we have these opening and closing broadcasts, which are expensive to produce because they are quite long-form and very few people watch them, and the idea that we should lock that into law and lock political parties into spending some of their broadcast allocation to do that simply does not make sense. It is not good for the broadcasters either. Let us be really frank about this. TVNZ had 25 percent fewer viewers in the timeslot that it set aside for the opening and closing broadcasts at the last election campaign [in 2014] than it would normally have had during that timeslot.”

Welcome to the 21st Century, esteemed leaders. Glad you could join us.

Are You FAILING in Social Media?

nz-biz-failing

Facebook and Other Social Media Can Be Highly Effective for Marketing …

… But Most NZ Businesses are Failing with Social Media

If you’re a Kiwi business, you need to read this NOW.

Unfortunately, too many businesses — in New Zealand, as elsewhere around the world — have the wrong idea about social media.

They spend most of their time on Facebook (and the other social networks) talking about themselves and their products.

If that’s you, sorry, you’ve got it wrong.

It’s called SOCIAL media for a reason.

Your followers are interested in a conversation, not a constant sales pitch.

THE REALITY

We track the performance of around 25,000 NZ Facebook pages on an ongoing basis.

More than two-thirds (69.5%) of those pages have NO engagement with 98% of their Facebook followers in a typical week.

Look at these three (sadly, all too typical) statistics for NZ businesses on Facebook. Hundreds and even thousands of followers, but hardly anyone’s talking:

Why no engagement?

Because too many posts are one-way broadcasts that get nobody talking or sharing, like this example:

victoria-khoss

Just 7 likes, and NO comments or shares, from a New York retailer with 7,088 Facebook followers!

(We’ve used an American example because we didn’t want to embarrass any of our local colleagues — but, as you’ll probably see from your own Facebook browsing, this is completely typical in New Zealand as well).

There is a solution.

Are Your Posts Actually Getting Seen by Your Followers?

Of course, we  shouldn’t ignore the elephant in the room — Facebook has dialled back on the percentage of your followers who will actually see your posts, with the result that (across the more than 25,000 NZ Facebook pages we track), on average just half a percent (0.55%) of those pages’ followers will engage with their posts.

Appalling? Yes. But YOU can do better.

In fact, our online training courses are all about teaching you how to use social media more effectively, so that you can dramatically improve on your performance on Facebook and other social networks.

Check out our online courses today:

Facebook Accelerator Programme
fba-banner

So you have a few hundred (or a few thousand) followers on Facebook but now you want to know how to get to the next level? Our Facebook Accelerator seven-part online course will lead you through the steps necessary to supercharge your Facebook presence and get Kiwi consumers engaging with you and your brands.

For more details of the Facebook Accelerator programme, please click here.

The Complete Facebook Marketing Course
completefb-banner

For those who wish to master Facebook Marketing in its entirety, we’ve created a ten-week online training programme which will take you from absolute beginner on Facebook to highly effective Facebook communicator.

For more details of the Complete Facebook Marketing programme, please click here.

If you want to improve your performance beyond Facebook, check out our Social Media Marketing Essentials course:

Social Media Marketing Essentials

Social Media Marketing Essentials

Social media is an ever-changing environment and unless you’re involved on a day to day basis you’re unlikely to stay up-to-date with the latest developments in the medium. So we’ve devised this social media marketing essentials course to capture the latest developments across the expanding world of social media for 2017.

For more details of the Social Media Essentials course, please click here.

For those new to Social Media Marketing:

social-media-banner

The Principles & Practice of Social Media Marketing is a seven-part online training course providing a comprehensive introduction to Social Media Marketing, from the Basics to detailed instructions on how to build and run a Social Media Marketing programme.

For more details of the Social Media Marketing online course, please click here.

For those who want to dig into Social Media Marketing in more detail:

advanced-banner-large

The Advanced Social Media Marketing online training course is designed to drill down into the specific details of the major Social Media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, Google Plus and others.

For more details of the Advanced Social Media Marketing programme, please click here.

How to Prepare an Effective Social Media Brief
brief-banner

Even if you don’t intend to become directly involved in social media yourself, you may still need to understand the principles, practices and opportunities of social media — for example, if you need to brief someone about running a social media campaign. This programme is designed to provide you with the insights necessary to prepare an effective brief.

For more details of the How to Prepare an Effective Social Media Brief programme, please click here.

How to Use LinkedIn Effectively – For Your Business And Your Career
linkedin-banner

This is a seven-part online training eCourse providing a comprehensive introduction to LinkedIn, from the basics to detailed instructions on how to use LinkedIn to promote your organisation, build your personal reputation, find a job, recruit prospective employees and even make sales.

For more details of the How to Use LinkedIn Effectively programme, please click here.

 

What You Need to Know About Using Video in Your Social Media Marketing

using video in your social media marketing

As you’ve probably heard, video is becoming more and more important for Social Media Marketing.

Want some numbers? Try these (from MediaKix):

  • Globally, traffic from online videos will constitute over 80% of all consumer internet traffic by 2020 (Cisco).
  • By 2019, the total U.S. digital video advertising spend is projected to eclipse $14 billionnearly 50% of that figure ($6.86 billion) is attributed to mobile video.
  • The number of videos published by U.S. users has exploded, increasing by 94% from January 2014 to January 2015. For international Facebook users, the increase in Facebook videos published is a still-impressive 75% annual growth rate (AdAge).
  • In November 2015, Facebook hit 8 billion video views daily (TechCrunch), doubling its figure of 4 billion from April just 6 months earlier. Each video view is counted after 3 seconds of watch time. At a linear rate, Facebook was expected to eclipse 16 billion video views by May 2016.
  • Facebook Videos have increased 360% across everyone’s News Feeds

And here are a few more stats, from Social Media Today:

  • One-third of all online activity is spent watching video
  • The average user is exposed to 32.3 videos in a month
  • 75% of online video viewers have interacted with an online video ad this month
  • 75% of executives watch work related videos on business websites at least once a week
  • 36% of online consumers trust video ads

So video is becoming more and more important in social media marketing. What does that mean for you?

We’ll tell you what that doesn’t mean: you can’t just add your TV ad to Facebook and call it a day. Sorry.

Unless you’re Air New Zealand, of course, and have the mighty All Blacks for your talent pool, in which case you can simply get three million people to watch and 67,000 to share your inflight safety video …

men-in-black

For us mere mortals, however, we’ve got to try a different angle.

Social Media Examiner offers up some timely advice:

#1: Produce the Right Video for Each Social Platform

Each social network has its own opportunity for video content. Before attempting to post videos on every platform, commit to mastering video on one or two networks first. You can easily incorporate video into your social media content by featuring your business’s best content for each platform.

Facebook

As a social media giant, Facebook is among the essential video platforms.

When you plan video content for Facebook, understand what Facebook viewers actually enjoy. Captions are essential to Facebook video because most Facebook users watch video without sound.

According to Digiday, almost 9-in-10 Facebook videos are consumed without sound, a signal that brands should consider producing video content that can still be engaging, even in silence (Facebook). To that point, Facebook found that adding captions to videos increases the watch time by 12%, on average.

captioned

Facebook users also enjoy live video. Facebook Live video is watched three times as much as regular video content and continues to gain popularity. Viewers expect live video to be less polished, so you can produce it without a big-budget production team.

live-olympics

Instagram

On Instagram, you can add video to your story or post video to your feed. With Instagram Stories, you can stream live video or post a 10-second clip. Either way, your video stays on your story for 24 hours. Videos posted to your Instagram feed can be up to 1 minute long.

Because Instagram limits video length, planning for brief videos is important. This emphasis on short videos is different from other social media video networks. On Instagram, make your videos captivating, quick to digest, and direct.

This directness applies to your Instagram captions, too. Ensure your call to action is clear and concise and your captions support the story in your video content, not compete with it.

ben-and-jerrys

Ben & Jerry’s are regular users of Instagram video, to mouthwatering effect

Twitter

Twitter’s feed moves quickly, making it hard for organic Twitter content to stick. But when Twitter video connects with users, it can spread far and wide.

Twitter recently made live video available in the app, so you don’t need to use or download Periscope. This move shows the demand for live video within the native platform and the general need for video content on social channels. In fact, a Twitter report revealed that 82% of users watch video content on the platform.

Because 90% of users view Twitter videos on a mobile device, make your Twitter content mobile-friendly and watchable on the average smartphone.

kors

A Twitter video that’s part of a campaign by Michael Kors

YouTube

YouTube is a better place for evergreen content than news or instant video. In fact, YouTube should be the place where your premium video content shines. Although the platform does have live video streaming, at the end of the day, quality execution is more important for YouTube, especially because videos on your channel can be recommended to users watching similar content.

YouTube marketing videos often have high bounce rates because they’re too boring or dry. To improve your YouTube marketing, pique curiosity through storytelling.

On YouTube, content needs to keep users engaged until your sales pitch or call to action arises. You don’t have to rush with your time limit, but you always have to consider social engagement.

most-engaging

The most engaging videos on YouTube in 2016, according to research from ListenFirst Media.

Focus on ways to educate your audience before you start shooting. Rushed and poorly edited videos will drive users to the Back button. However, high-quality video can hold users’ attention and drive traffic to your most important pages.

Snapchat

Just like Instagram, Snapchat is all about visual content. To increase video on this platform for your marketing, start by being active and producing plenty of content. Snapchat reports its users watch 10 billion videos per day, and Business Insider reports that active users spend an average of 25-30 minutes a day on the platform.

#2: Define Goals for Your Video Content

When you start to craft your video content strategy, you should first know the purpose of video for your brand. Is it aimed at increasing brand awareness? Is there an educational component? Are you going to be heavily promotional or produce newsworthy content?

Before getting started, think about what you want to gain from investing time and resources in creating video content. Some of the most important metrics to consider include:

  • Site traffic
  • View count (video plays)
  • Shares
  • Video completion
  • Brand awareness
  • Lead generation
  • Customer retention

After you establish your goals, plan what types of content you’ll create to achieve those goals. Don’t think about videos as one-off projects. Instead, think through campaigns and themes you’ll cover and test over time. No matter what approach you choose, be consistent.

#3: Develop a Consistent Theme or Format

Building on the last tip, it’s great to have a social video theme or common message to your content. When you know the purpose of your content and the style you’re pursuing, think of a theme you can use to inform your video content.

#4: Invest in the Right Equipment for Your Budget

Most brands wanting to produce social media videos are stuck because of one major reason: cost. Cameras, microphones, lighting, editing equipment, and actors can add up quickly. If you’re not careful, video can cannibalize your content-creation funds.

However, you can be money-conscious without sacrificing quality. For starters, try to do as much in-house filming as possible, because production companies can be costly. Check out rental options or even better, use your own devices. For example, this video explains how to create your own lighting setup for about $100.

Here are the essentials of shooting quality video for your company:

  • An affordable camera: Cameras on smartphones are just as powerful as some recording equipment. Don’t waste your money on a brand-new camera when you have something highly useful in your pocket.
  • Simple lighting kit: Great lighting is essential when you’re filming video. Try to invest in a standard lighting kit or build your own.
  • Quality microphone: If you’ve seen a low-budget commercial that makes you cringe, it likely had poor lighting and cheap microphones. Purchase a quality mic. Don’t use the built-in mic on your smartphone.
  • Tripod: Your video needs to be stable and clear. Luckily, several tripods are built to fit your smartphone.
  • Editing software: Several affordable or free video-editing software options are available. Smartphone apps like Videoshop and Splice give you essential editing functions.

Social Media Today tells us about video marketing trends that matter in 2017. We’ve singled out these two as being of particular note:

1. The Rise of 360-Degree Videos

A recent case study by Magnifyre revealed something noteworthy about the 360-degree video format – the average percentage of people who viewed a 360-degree video was 28.81% higher than for the same video in a non 360-degree format. The case study also showed that twice the number of viewers watched the 360-degree video to completion.

2. Videos Watched on Multiple Devices

According to a Think with Google report, 85% of adults ages 18-49 use multiple devices at the same time. It also reports that two thirds of YouTube users watch YouTube on a second screen while watching TV. This tendency to watch videos across several devices (including TV) will probably increase.

It’s Time to Upskill in Online Video Marketing

With all this stuff going on in online video (and this is only the tip of the iceberg), we reckon it’s way past time for Kiwi marketers to upskill themselves in video marketing.

We have two courses that directly address the topic:

Online Video Marketing - Short Course

As you’d expect given the name of this course, that’s what it’s all about. It’s a four-part short course designed to bring you up to speed on online video marketing.

For full details of our Online Video Marketing course, please click here.

Social Media Marketing Essentials

This course, on the other hand, covers online video as just one of its topics as it delves into the most important social media developments of 2017.

For more details of the Social Media Essentials course, please click here.

Can You Answer These 7 Digital Marketing Questions?

digital-marketing-questions

So how knowledgeable are you about what’s happening in digital marketing in New Zealand?

Here are seven questions to test your digital marketing knowledge:

1 Which is expected to grow more strongly in NZ in 2017, digital or non-digital spend?

2 What are Facebook Instant Articles and why are they important?

3 What are the names of the digital voice assistants belonging to Apple, Google, Microsoft and Amazon — and which was the one most in evidence at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas?

4 Snapchat recently released what new type of video?

5 Who recently purchased LinkedIn and how much did they pay?

6 How many Kiwis belong to Facebook, according to their latest membership data?

7 There are now at least 600 million AMP pages on 700,000 domains. But what exactly is AMP and what does it do?

(Email us with your answers at info (at) socialmedia.org.nz — all correct answers will go into a draw to win a free course)

 

PS If you feel you’re falling short, upskill yourself in Digital Marketing for 2017 with our online training courses – SAVE $100 with our Early Bird Rates

Available Courses

 

Here are the current courses (click on the links for more details about each course):

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING COURSES

Social Media Marketing Essentials

Social Media Marketing Essentials

Social media is an ever-changing environment and unless you’re involved on a day to day basis you’re unlikely to stay up-to-date with the latest developments in the medium. So we’ve devised this social media marketing essentials course to capture the latest developments across the expanding world of social media for 2017.

For more details of the Social Media Essentials course, please click here.

 

Advanced Social Media Marketing course
advanced-banner-large

This course is designed to drill down into the specific details of the major Social Media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, Google Plus and others.

For more details of the Advanced Social Media Marketing programme, please click here.

Facebook Accelerator Programme
fba-banner

So you have a few hundred (or a few thousand) followers on Facebook but now you want to know how to get to the next level? Our Facebook Accelerator seven-part online course will lead you through the steps necessary to supercharge your Facebook presence and get Kiwi consumers engaging with you and your brands.

For more details of the Facebook Accelerator programme, please click here.

The Principles & Practice of Social Media Marketing
social-media-banner

This is a seven-part eCourse providing a comprehensive introduction to Social Media Marketing, from the Basics to detailed instructions on how to build and run a Social Media Marketing programme.

For more details of the Social Media Marketing online course, please click here.

The Complete Facebook Marketing Course
completefb-banner

For those who wish to master Facebook Marketing in its entirety, we’ve created a ten-week online training programme which will take you from absolute beginner on Facebook to highly effective Facebook communicator.

For more details of the Complete Facebook Marketing programme, please click here.

How to Prepare an Effective Social Media Brief
brief-banner

Even if you don’t intend to become directly involved in social media yourself, you may still need to understand the principles, practices and opportunities of social media — for example, if you need to brief someone about running a social media campaign. This programme is designed to provide you with the insights necessary to prepare an effective brief.

For more details of the How to Prepare an Effective Social Media Brief programme, please click here.

How to Use LinkedIn Effectively – For Your Business And Your Career
linkedin-banner

This is a seven-part online training eCourse providing a comprehensive introduction to LinkedIn, from the basics to detailed instructions on how to use LinkedIn to promote your organisation, build your personal reputation, find a job, recruit prospective employees and even make sales.

For more details of the How to Use LinkedIn Effectively programme, please click here.

How To Create Effective Facebook Posts

Creating Effective Facebook Posts

The biggest challenge for any business using Facebook pages these days? Creating Facebook posts that get noticed and get shared.

So we’ve created a four-part online training course for New Zealand organisations that tackles this problem head on, identifies the secrets of effective Facebook posts and shows you exactly what you need to do to stand out on Facebook.

For more details of the How To Create Effective Facebook Posts short course, please click here.

ONLINE VIDEO MARKETING COURSE

Online Video Marketing - Short Course

Online Video is no longer an “up-and-coming” marketing tactic — it’s here, and it’s a powerful way to communicate your brand story, explain your value proposition, and build relationships with your customers and prospects.

Remember the old cliche that a picture is worth a thousand words? According to an estimate by Dr James McQuivey of Forrester Research, one minute of video is equal to 1.8 million words.

So let’s cut to the chase.

It’s well past time for you to upskill yourself in online video marketing.

That’s why we’re launching our newest short course on the topic.

For more details of the Online Video Marketing course, please click here.

 

ECOMMERCE COURSES

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Our online course, “Mastering eCommerce”, tells you what you need to know about selling effectively online in a seven-week programme that steps you through the principles and practices of eCommerce in New Zealand.

For more details of the Mastering eCommerce programme, please click here.

Advanced Selling on Trade Me
trademe-banner

This is a seven-week eCourse providing a comprehensive masterclass on selling on Trade Me. The course presumes you are already familiar with the basics of selling on Trade Me.

For more details of the Advanced Selling on Trade Me programme, please click here.

MOBILE MARKETING

mobile-header

Smartphone usage has hit the tipping point, in New Zealand as elsewhere. According to Google’s Consumer Barometer (July 2015), three-quarters of New Zealanders now have smartphones — and these devices are dramatically changing consumer behaviour, with significant implications for Kiwi businesses.To help you master this challenging mobile environment, we’ve created a dedicated online training course about Mobile Marketing.

For more details of the Principle & Practice of Mobile Marketing course, please click here.

Are You Making These Facebook Marketing Mistakes?

facebook-mistakes

Just how well are YOU really doing on Facebook? Are you making classic mistakes like these:

1. Too much self-promotion

Do your Facebook posts only talk about You, You, You?

As Jeff Bullas notes:

It is okay to share your achievements with your loyal followers but you should never overdo it. If you are not offering value to your visitors or are not providing them with the information they are looking for, you’re missing out a lot. People spend time on Facebook to get entertained, inspired and interact with like-minded people. So in order to promote your brand, you should find innovative ways that inspire visitors and give them a reason to connect.

If you become too promotional, you will soon see the ‘Likes’ turning into ‘Dislikes’.

Here’s a typical example, from Acer Australia & New Zealand:

acer

The local page has more than 50,000 total likes, but this post (a typical recent example) could only attract one thumbs-up.

We’re not picking on Acer — it’s just a typical big brand example, seeing Facebook as yet another broadcast mechanism rather than a chance to interact with customers.

 

2.  Being Boring or Predictable

As Leyl Master Black observes:

When they’re thinking about marketing, some business owners forget that Facebook is a social place where people share things they find funny, interesting or useful with their friends. Think about what kind of content your fans would actually want to share when planning your posts.

Peter Shankman, social media consultant, entrepreneur and author of “Customer Service: New Rules for a Social Media World”, also cautions against becoming too predictable. “Status updates by themselves get boring. But then again, so do photos, videos and multimedia as a whole. Your job is to mix it up. The moment you become predictable, boring or annoying, they’ll hide you from their feed. So keep it varied and personal—a video here, a photo here, a tag of one of your fans here.”

Creating too much “filler” content by auto-publishing content from your blog or Twitter feed can also derail your efforts. Joseph Manna, community manager at Infusionsoft, recommends using Facebook’s native publishing tools to gain the most benefit from Facebook.

“Whatever you do, don’t automate everything,” says Manna. “It’s nice to ‘set and forget,’ but the risk is two-fold: publishing systems sometimes have issues, and Facebook places low-priority on auto-published content.”

Here are a couple of GOOD examples of a local driving school changing things up and providing interesting content while still staying relevant to their product category:

alert1

And:

alert2

Some more common mistakes, as identified by Dummies.com:

3. TLDR

A study by BuddyMedia found that status updates of less than 80 characters received a 27 percent higher reaction than longer updates. This makes sense when you think about how you use Facebook and how fast the News Feed flies by.

Too Long:

too-long

Posting lengthy paragraphs as a status update is like giving your Facebook fans homework. On the other hand, short updates such as questions and short polls get a higher reaction simply because the barrier to participation is very low.

Much better:

cancer2

4. Ignoring Comments

Facebook fans are people, like you. If they make the effort to leave a comment or reply within a thread on your Facebook Page, they want to know that you’re listening. Pages that consistently ignore posts by fans aren’t as successful as Pages that participate in comment threads. Fans are less likely to return if they don’t feel heard.
The other reason why you want to reply to posts from fans is that Facebook sends that fan a notification, bringing him back to your Page!

Here’s an unfortunate  Twitter example (dating back to 2013 and hopefully resolved these days) of customer service only during working hours:

wpid-baa-2

Need help to avoid these Facebook mistakes? Check out our Facebook online training courses:

Facebook Accelerator Programme
fba-banner

So you have a few hundred (or a few thousand) followers on Facebook but now you want to know how to get to the next level? Our Facebook Accelerator seven-part online course will lead you through the steps necessary to supercharge your Facebook presence and get Kiwi consumers engaging with you and your brands.

For more details of the Facebook Accelerator programme, please click here.

The Complete Facebook Marketing Course
completefb-banner

For those who wish to master Facebook Marketing in its entirety, we’ve created a ten-week online training programme which will take you from absolute beginner on Facebook to highly effective Facebook communicator.

For more details of the Complete Facebook Marketing programme, please click here.